American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Get more schooling or training

File under: education, job training, jobs

0 (0 votes)

From: Therese S., North Hollywood, CA

I always accept free training whenever I am not working. I am not tied to any one type of job. I don't believe in "careers," but rather in being flexible and open to change. The only thing I ask is that the job not be in a formal environment as I am not happy in such a place. Job training needs to take into account a person's background and prior successes. Since there aren't really a lot of jobs, what people need is to sit back for a while and get more education while they wait for things to pick up again.

I do think the government can drive more jobs by using its own buying to stimulate demand. For example, the military needs a lot of stuff, and to stimulate green economy, it can require that products be reusable, recyclable and energy efficient. It can, for example, buy LED light bulbs, and electricity and fuel from a variety of renewable sources.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.