American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Vote for fiscal conservatives (regardless of party affiliation)

File under: personal responsibility, personal charitable acts, restraining government, enabling populace, informed voting, taxes, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Richard B., Portland, OR

Right now the greatest stumbling block to our quality of life and our personal economic situations is the rampant disregard for us, the people, by the arrogant officials who we have elected in our cities, states and nation. Each of us must become actively involved and take the time to research the values and character of the people whom we elect, and then stay on top of them once they are in office to ensure that they live up to those values. Without controlling our national and state debts and dedicating our political energy to providing an environment in which businesses can succeed and grow, we will only see an increase in poverty.

To reverse our poverty trend, we must research and vote for fiscal conservatives, be they Democrat, Republican or independent -- it doesn't matter. Our nation has always been one of social responsibility on an individual level. Unfortunately, when we individuals can not have faith in our own solvency due to mismanagement of our government and an ever increasing confiscation of whatever wealth we may have earned, our ability to perform our personal responsibilities to those less fortunate is impeded.

It seems that the policies and laws that have recently been enacted do little to raise people out of poverty, but instead, have put more people in poverty. Each and every one of us must become responsible citizens where we no longer rely on the status quo of what we have assumed about political party affiliations. We must actually look at each candidate and decide if that person is the best and most trustworthy official to represent us and put forth and support policies which restrain government growth and remove restraints upon personal growth. If we aren't willing to take the time and effort to fulfill our personal responsibility to cast an informed vote, then how can we expect an electee to honor their commitment to us rather than to the leadership of their particular party? It is our fault that we let these people con us, and it is our duty and responsibility to make sure that it doesn't happen again.


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American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.16

    Fighting for ‘Our School’

    What's the role of a school in a rural town? We begin our series on rural schools by looking at a state where the fight has been particularly fierce: Vermont.
  • 06.09.16

    How Do We Learn Better: Digital or Print?

    Do you understand facts better online or in print? New research has massive implications for teaching in the 21st century.
  • 06.02.16

    Theological Schools Feel the Squeeze

    Theological schools are straining for cash as they suffer from drops in enrollment over the past few years. Our guest tells us how they are dealing with it.
  • 05.26.16

    The ‘Invisible Tax’ on Teachers of Color

    Our guest says the so-called 'invisible tax' on teachers of color leads to burnout at a time when teachers of color are already leaving the profession more quickly than their white colleagues.