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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Vote for fiscal conservatives (regardless of party affiliation)

File under: personal responsibility, personal charitable acts, restraining government, enabling populace, informed voting, taxes, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Richard B., Portland, OR

Right now the greatest stumbling block to our quality of life and our personal economic situations is the rampant disregard for us, the people, by the arrogant officials who we have elected in our cities, states and nation. Each of us must become actively involved and take the time to research the values and character of the people whom we elect, and then stay on top of them once they are in office to ensure that they live up to those values. Without controlling our national and state debts and dedicating our political energy to providing an environment in which businesses can succeed and grow, we will only see an increase in poverty.

To reverse our poverty trend, we must research and vote for fiscal conservatives, be they Democrat, Republican or independent -- it doesn't matter. Our nation has always been one of social responsibility on an individual level. Unfortunately, when we individuals can not have faith in our own solvency due to mismanagement of our government and an ever increasing confiscation of whatever wealth we may have earned, our ability to perform our personal responsibilities to those less fortunate is impeded.

It seems that the policies and laws that have recently been enacted do little to raise people out of poverty, but instead, have put more people in poverty. Each and every one of us must become responsible citizens where we no longer rely on the status quo of what we have assumed about political party affiliations. We must actually look at each candidate and decide if that person is the best and most trustworthy official to represent us and put forth and support policies which restrain government growth and remove restraints upon personal growth. If we aren't willing to take the time and effort to fulfill our personal responsibility to cast an informed vote, then how can we expect an electee to honor their commitment to us rather than to the leadership of their particular party? It is our fault that we let these people con us, and it is our duty and responsibility to make sure that it doesn't happen again.


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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.
  • 01.15.16

    Learning as a Science

    What does research say about how students learn best? A group of deans from schools of education around the country has united to make sure future teachers are armed with information about what works in the classroom.