American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Vote for fiscal conservatives (regardless of party affiliation)

File under: personal responsibility, personal charitable acts, restraining government, enabling populace, informed voting, taxes, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Richard B., Portland, OR

Right now the greatest stumbling block to our quality of life and our personal economic situations is the rampant disregard for us, the people, by the arrogant officials who we have elected in our cities, states and nation. Each of us must become actively involved and take the time to research the values and character of the people whom we elect, and then stay on top of them once they are in office to ensure that they live up to those values. Without controlling our national and state debts and dedicating our political energy to providing an environment in which businesses can succeed and grow, we will only see an increase in poverty.

To reverse our poverty trend, we must research and vote for fiscal conservatives, be they Democrat, Republican or independent -- it doesn't matter. Our nation has always been one of social responsibility on an individual level. Unfortunately, when we individuals can not have faith in our own solvency due to mismanagement of our government and an ever increasing confiscation of whatever wealth we may have earned, our ability to perform our personal responsibilities to those less fortunate is impeded.

It seems that the policies and laws that have recently been enacted do little to raise people out of poverty, but instead, have put more people in poverty. Each and every one of us must become responsible citizens where we no longer rely on the status quo of what we have assumed about political party affiliations. We must actually look at each candidate and decide if that person is the best and most trustworthy official to represent us and put forth and support policies which restrain government growth and remove restraints upon personal growth. If we aren't willing to take the time and effort to fulfill our personal responsibility to cast an informed vote, then how can we expect an electee to honor their commitment to us rather than to the leadership of their particular party? It is our fault that we let these people con us, and it is our duty and responsibility to make sure that it doesn't happen again.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.