American RadioWorks |
Michael Walker with students in Minneapolis (photo: @MPS_BlackMales Twitter account)

Boosting Black Male Student Achievement

The Minneapolis Public School District created an Office of Black Male Student Achievement earlier this year. One goal of the office is to help young African American men graduate from high school in greater numbers.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Vote for fiscal conservatives (regardless of party affiliation)

File under: personal responsibility, personal charitable acts, restraining government, enabling populace, informed voting, taxes, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Richard B., Portland, OR

Right now the greatest stumbling block to our quality of life and our personal economic situations is the rampant disregard for us, the people, by the arrogant officials who we have elected in our cities, states and nation. Each of us must become actively involved and take the time to research the values and character of the people whom we elect, and then stay on top of them once they are in office to ensure that they live up to those values. Without controlling our national and state debts and dedicating our political energy to providing an environment in which businesses can succeed and grow, we will only see an increase in poverty.

To reverse our poverty trend, we must research and vote for fiscal conservatives, be they Democrat, Republican or independent -- it doesn't matter. Our nation has always been one of social responsibility on an individual level. Unfortunately, when we individuals can not have faith in our own solvency due to mismanagement of our government and an ever increasing confiscation of whatever wealth we may have earned, our ability to perform our personal responsibilities to those less fortunate is impeded.

It seems that the policies and laws that have recently been enacted do little to raise people out of poverty, but instead, have put more people in poverty. Each and every one of us must become responsible citizens where we no longer rely on the status quo of what we have assumed about political party affiliations. We must actually look at each candidate and decide if that person is the best and most trustworthy official to represent us and put forth and support policies which restrain government growth and remove restraints upon personal growth. If we aren't willing to take the time and effort to fulfill our personal responsibility to cast an informed vote, then how can we expect an electee to honor their commitment to us rather than to the leadership of their particular party? It is our fault that we let these people con us, and it is our duty and responsibility to make sure that it doesn't happen again.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Michael Walker with students in Minneapolis (photo: @MPS_BlackMales Twitter account)

Boosting Black Male Student Achievement

The Minneapolis Public School District created an Office of Black Male Student Achievement earlier this year. One goal of the office is to help young African American men graduate from high school in greater numbers.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.