American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Vote for fiscal conservatives (regardless of party affiliation)

File under: personal responsibility, personal charitable acts, restraining government, enabling populace, informed voting, taxes, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Richard B., Portland, OR

Right now the greatest stumbling block to our quality of life and our personal economic situations is the rampant disregard for us, the people, by the arrogant officials who we have elected in our cities, states and nation. Each of us must become actively involved and take the time to research the values and character of the people whom we elect, and then stay on top of them once they are in office to ensure that they live up to those values. Without controlling our national and state debts and dedicating our political energy to providing an environment in which businesses can succeed and grow, we will only see an increase in poverty.

To reverse our poverty trend, we must research and vote for fiscal conservatives, be they Democrat, Republican or independent -- it doesn't matter. Our nation has always been one of social responsibility on an individual level. Unfortunately, when we individuals can not have faith in our own solvency due to mismanagement of our government and an ever increasing confiscation of whatever wealth we may have earned, our ability to perform our personal responsibilities to those less fortunate is impeded.

It seems that the policies and laws that have recently been enacted do little to raise people out of poverty, but instead, have put more people in poverty. Each and every one of us must become responsible citizens where we no longer rely on the status quo of what we have assumed about political party affiliations. We must actually look at each candidate and decide if that person is the best and most trustworthy official to represent us and put forth and support policies which restrain government growth and remove restraints upon personal growth. If we aren't willing to take the time and effort to fulfill our personal responsibility to cast an informed vote, then how can we expect an electee to honor their commitment to us rather than to the leadership of their particular party? It is our fault that we let these people con us, and it is our duty and responsibility to make sure that it doesn't happen again.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.