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Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Return value of all land occupied to the community (Abolish private land ownership)

File under: land ownership, other

0 (0 votes)

From: Ronald R., Pittsburgh, PA

Poverty in America started as a perpetual permanent anchor on our economy when the frontier closed in the 1880s. This is when access to land for labor and investment closed. The result was a depression in wages and an added cost for investment. All progress was absorbed in rent.

Think about it: With all the land "bottled up" in royal titles to land, everybody born is obligated to pay another human being to exist. The cost to live on a space on this earth is the largest burden for families to afford. This is true for people everywhere, the United States included.

The only solution is to recognize the origination of the problem: private ownership of the rental value of land. Because of this private ownership, all progress eventually is absorbed by landowners, via "law of rent." The remedy is to recapture the rental value of land back to the community who funds all the land value in the first place.


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American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Recent Posts

  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.