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The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Move commodity subsidies to small-scale farmers

File under: local farmers, government subsidies, food, jobs, other

0 (0 votes)

From: Chris P., St. Louis, MO

Most of our farmers cannot make a living wage doing what they do. Whether a commodity farmer (corn, wheat, soybeans) or as a small scale vegetable farmer, the costs are too high to make a real living doing it.

The federal government needs to move money from the commodities markets and put a lot more money into the production of fruits and vegetables. Not only would it reduce poverty by getting more individuals going back to the farm to grow crops, but it would reduce the artificially low prices of junk food.

I am dealing with this challenge by buying as much food as I can from local providers. Junk food is cheap and easy to find, but it starves both the economy and our bodies of health.

The government can do so much good if it would just ignore the special interest groups and take a good look at what they can do to TRULY help Americans. And we can do so much good by voting with our debit cards. When we buy local food, it's not necessarily about the environment. It's about supporting our local farmers and keeping them fully employed.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

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