American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Move commodity subsidies to small-scale farmers

File under: local farmers, government subsidies, food, jobs, other

0 (0 votes)

From: Chris P., St. Louis, MO

Most of our farmers cannot make a living wage doing what they do. Whether a commodity farmer (corn, wheat, soybeans) or as a small scale vegetable farmer, the costs are too high to make a real living doing it.

The federal government needs to move money from the commodities markets and put a lot more money into the production of fruits and vegetables. Not only would it reduce poverty by getting more individuals going back to the farm to grow crops, but it would reduce the artificially low prices of junk food.

I am dealing with this challenge by buying as much food as I can from local providers. Junk food is cheap and easy to find, but it starves both the economy and our bodies of health.

The government can do so much good if it would just ignore the special interest groups and take a good look at what they can do to TRULY help Americans. And we can do so much good by voting with our debit cards. When we buy local food, it's not necessarily about the environment. It's about supporting our local farmers and keeping them fully employed.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.