American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Follow some brutally simple steps

File under: health care, education, city planning, ending war, equality

0 (0 votes)

From: Karl H., Baraboo, WI

It's Brutally Simple:

Get out of Afghanistan (Just pay the thugs off, and use them to build schools and such) and Iraq. NOW. Tell the Israeli government we will pull the plug on the billions we send them unless they halt the settlements and agree to the 1967 borders. Forget the oil or whatever reason we are so involved in the Middle East. Stop the corporate war machine; listen to General Eisenhower: the military is not for profit or jobs creation. Just look at our military budget and what might be done with even half of that sum. Problems solved.

Provide public-funded heath care for all. Ban corporate health care. Our hospitals should be getting smaller! Truth is, corporations make billions off our sickness. And poor people, who crowd our emergency rooms, cost us all many times more than if they had preventative health care. Duh.

Design cities around the needs of people not the needs of the automobile, coal, oil and gas industries and sprawl developers. Starting point: every grade school kid should be able to walk to school.

Invest in education -- not-for-profit education. Education does not cost in the long run. Know better, do better. And throw out those stupid standards!

Eat good food. Poor people need good food. Instead of well-paid, highly-educated nutritionists worrying about food labels, how about more food that does not have labels?

And none of the above will happen until we severely limit campaign contributions. How about $1,000 per constituent per election cycle? Zero from non-individuals. ZERO. This would mean the press would have to remember what they are for and actually cover campaigns and politics. How about that? An actual free press that does what the Founders had in mind, free from the profit motive. We need to separate this most vital institution from, guess again, corporate profiteering. Public campaigns, public news, pubic good.

In short, follow the money. That is, poor people are poor because someone else has all the money, influence, power and advantages. Fighting over the leftover crumbs ain't going to cut it.

Unless we really don't believe all people are equal.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.