American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

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  • 04.01.15

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    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Follow some brutally simple steps

File under: health care, education, city planning, ending war, equality

0 (0 votes)

From: Karl H., Baraboo, WI

It's Brutally Simple:

Get out of Afghanistan (Just pay the thugs off, and use them to build schools and such) and Iraq. NOW. Tell the Israeli government we will pull the plug on the billions we send them unless they halt the settlements and agree to the 1967 borders. Forget the oil or whatever reason we are so involved in the Middle East. Stop the corporate war machine; listen to General Eisenhower: the military is not for profit or jobs creation. Just look at our military budget and what might be done with even half of that sum. Problems solved.

Provide public-funded heath care for all. Ban corporate health care. Our hospitals should be getting smaller! Truth is, corporations make billions off our sickness. And poor people, who crowd our emergency rooms, cost us all many times more than if they had preventative health care. Duh.

Design cities around the needs of people not the needs of the automobile, coal, oil and gas industries and sprawl developers. Starting point: every grade school kid should be able to walk to school.

Invest in education -- not-for-profit education. Education does not cost in the long run. Know better, do better. And throw out those stupid standards!

Eat good food. Poor people need good food. Instead of well-paid, highly-educated nutritionists worrying about food labels, how about more food that does not have labels?

And none of the above will happen until we severely limit campaign contributions. How about $1,000 per constituent per election cycle? Zero from non-individuals. ZERO. This would mean the press would have to remember what they are for and actually cover campaigns and politics. How about that? An actual free press that does what the Founders had in mind, free from the profit motive. We need to separate this most vital institution from, guess again, corporate profiteering. Public campaigns, public news, pubic good.

In short, follow the money. That is, poor people are poor because someone else has all the money, influence, power and advantages. Fighting over the leftover crumbs ain't going to cut it.

Unless we really don't believe all people are equal.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Recent Posts

  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.