American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Ease process of getting small business loans

File under: financing, small business loans, jobs

0 (0 votes)

From: Thomas T., Mobridge, SD

Everything's going to be okay.

That's the line I keep hearing, and something I keep telling myself. I started my art business last year, and received my state sales tax license. But so far, that's as far as I've gotten. Recently, an invitation to the 2011 Governor's Conference on Tourism, sent out to Made in South Dakota producers, came to my door. Being there, showing my work in our state's capital would be the shot in the arm my art business needs. However, booth space is $75. Housing and food for the two days would cost about $300 total. I have roughly $3 in savings now -- just enough to keep the account open. So I politely e-mailed those in charge of the event, and disappointedly declined. I now know how Cinderella felt being left home, while her sisters got to go to the ball.

My idea for reducing poverty is less government red tape to get loans for small businesses. I keep prices for my work low so everyone can afford something. Government and big businesses (banks especially) can afford to open up on loans.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.