American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Support people early on: Avoid increasing poverty through neglect

File under: poverty, job training, education, jobs, future vision

0 (0 votes)

From: E G., Eden Prairie, MN

There are obviously several reasons for and causes of poverty. Stemming poverty has multiple parts:

Prongs

Focus on people now in poverty and people who are broken and will end up in poverty or breed more future poverty. Keeping the problem manageable is crucial, otherwise we will never catch up. We will never mitigate the circumstances of poverty. Change what we can change. Adapt.

Driver's ed and maps

People in poverty need a toolkit and road map, in the event they can be self-actualized to work their way out.

The young and healthy, for example, may mostly need a framework for how to succeed. They have a lifetime ahead of them. If left to flounder, they could add to the poverty problem. Instead, nip it in the bud by teaching them.

Toolkits and tire patches

Getting a handle on poverty requires addressing people's hope and entire worldview before they become jaded and learn bad habits, or become victims acted upon in society. Patch them up enough to contribute to their own exodus from poverty.

Roads

Then we have to create some options. This should be apparent to anyone whose world has been rocked in the current economic recession.

Obviously, if there are no jobs or educational opportunities,

looking for work or trying to become educated is a dead end for many people.

Education

Remote learning is important in this.

We don't need the overhead of brick and mortar schools as much as we used to. This should make it more affordable to acquire some basic skill sets and enhance the skill set of older workers. And, it is a better use of time than commuting to and from those edifices.

Two years of community college for the population, or prepping students to make them ready for college is essential in the future -- for people in poverty, and for citizens who are the support structure for these unfortunate people.

Future workers are expected to change careers four to five times in a lifetime, yet there is no versatile preparation that facilitates such career changes without returning someone to the bottom rung in his or her new field. Everyone needs to be versatile, because anyone could fall into poverty or near poverty.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.