American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Teach and model self determination

File under: life training, mentoring, job training, personalfinance

0 (0 votes)

From: Mary Lou Z., Milwaukee, WI

My parents grew up poor, and they raised their children in poverty. We had no money, but we were not poor in spirit. Our parents had limited education, but they were very smart. They knew that limiting one's wants was the only way to build a financial ladder for climbing out of poverty. We lived a sustainable lifestyle before it was in fashion. Moreover, they observed that the members of our community who lived in relative comfort had educations, and they told us we needed to succeed in school if we were to succeed in life. They taught us to grow food, preserve it, and rely on it for our meals; the only things purchased at the grocer were staples we could use to create our own bread and other standard fare.

I don't expect that we can return to the past. But, I believe we need to teach our children and families how to use their limited resources better, stretch that dollar so there's a spare one left to save. We need classes, workshops, and mentors in the neighborhood communities who can provide this hands-on assistance. We need to teach poor folks how to save, avoid being ripped off, use a credit union, and take charge of their financial lives. Food pantries fill short-term needs, but cookeries, where a person can gain both domestic and work skills, are far more effective in helping individuals to grow in day-to-day decision making.

So many of our current mechanisms for fighting poverty create a cycle of dependency. Instead, we need to help individuals get connected with groups that promote self-actualization and community-building, and receive mentoring in becoming the leaders. We have great examples already in place: Habitat for Humanity and community housing groups, community gardens and other sustainable efforts.

And, in all of this, we must keep our children in the forefront. They make up the majority of America's poor, and they are going to need education, support and guidance to make the climb out of that hole!


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.