American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Teach and model self determination

File under: life training, mentoring, job training, personalfinance

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From: Mary Lou Z., Milwaukee, WI

My parents grew up poor, and they raised their children in poverty. We had no money, but we were not poor in spirit. Our parents had limited education, but they were very smart. They knew that limiting one's wants was the only way to build a financial ladder for climbing out of poverty. We lived a sustainable lifestyle before it was in fashion. Moreover, they observed that the members of our community who lived in relative comfort had educations, and they told us we needed to succeed in school if we were to succeed in life. They taught us to grow food, preserve it, and rely on it for our meals; the only things purchased at the grocer were staples we could use to create our own bread and other standard fare.

I don't expect that we can return to the past. But, I believe we need to teach our children and families how to use their limited resources better, stretch that dollar so there's a spare one left to save. We need classes, workshops, and mentors in the neighborhood communities who can provide this hands-on assistance. We need to teach poor folks how to save, avoid being ripped off, use a credit union, and take charge of their financial lives. Food pantries fill short-term needs, but cookeries, where a person can gain both domestic and work skills, are far more effective in helping individuals to grow in day-to-day decision making.

So many of our current mechanisms for fighting poverty create a cycle of dependency. Instead, we need to help individuals get connected with groups that promote self-actualization and community-building, and receive mentoring in becoming the leaders. We have great examples already in place: Habitat for Humanity and community housing groups, community gardens and other sustainable efforts.

And, in all of this, we must keep our children in the forefront. They make up the majority of America's poor, and they are going to need education, support and guidance to make the climb out of that hole!


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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.