American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Stop random drug testing of federal employees

File under: government spending, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Cathy W., Duluth, MN

It makes much more sense to pay attention to behavior and performance and test only when there is a reason. I bet this one change would save quite a bit of money that could be better spent on health care for people like me. That is just one idea. Our government is so mired in policies and practices that are useless and should be abandoned. Listen to the people at the bottom. I am now, at age fifty-two, living at or below the poverty level. I never dreamed it would happen to me. I have two college degrees and cannot get work in my field. I have worked hard and lived with integrity all my life, and it is very hard to see what is happening to us as a country.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

Recent Posts

  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.
  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.