American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Reduce employer overhead...and more

File under: jobs, taxes, defense spending, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Bob S., Gem Lake, MN

It is critical that we change the focus toward job existence rather than job creation. Overhead on jobs is too high compared to the overseas competition. Overhead here is federal taxes and employee medical insurance. (A very significant cost of overhead is the cost of wars and the resulting costs from a war).

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP -- otherwise known as food stamps) and Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are very excellent programs to fight poverty.

On the state level, we need more inspectors to determine that corporations are meeting their quotas on equal opportunity hiring.

Most Favored Nation Status should be revamped to favor newly emerging democracies such as Bangladesh and struggling democracies such as Mexico. If there were not such a differential in wealth at our border with Mexico, there would not be a problem.

For tax reduction measures, we need to decrease our use of the military (reduce costs of wars) and quit trying to rebuild countries our military has destroyed. I reference the book "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin to support that idea.

FDR was right: Tax to the ability to pay.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.