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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Reduce employer overhead...and more

File under: jobs, taxes, defense spending, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Bob S., Gem Lake, MN

It is critical that we change the focus toward job existence rather than job creation. Overhead on jobs is too high compared to the overseas competition. Overhead here is federal taxes and employee medical insurance. (A very significant cost of overhead is the cost of wars and the resulting costs from a war).

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP -- otherwise known as food stamps) and Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are very excellent programs to fight poverty.

On the state level, we need more inspectors to determine that corporations are meeting their quotas on equal opportunity hiring.

Most Favored Nation Status should be revamped to favor newly emerging democracies such as Bangladesh and struggling democracies such as Mexico. If there were not such a differential in wealth at our border with Mexico, there would not be a problem.

For tax reduction measures, we need to decrease our use of the military (reduce costs of wars) and quit trying to rebuild countries our military has destroyed. I reference the book "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin to support that idea.

FDR was right: Tax to the ability to pay.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.