American RadioWorks |
Having slept poorly the night before and arrived to a cold classroom Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig High School student Irvin Kingbird, a senior, curled up with a blanket and pillow in the corner of the resource room to rest and get warm Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2014, at the Bug High School in Bena, MN.   Photo: David Joles, Star Tribune.

Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Reduce employer overhead...and more

File under: jobs, taxes, defense spending, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Bob S., Gem Lake, MN

It is critical that we change the focus toward job existence rather than job creation. Overhead on jobs is too high compared to the overseas competition. Overhead here is federal taxes and employee medical insurance. (A very significant cost of overhead is the cost of wars and the resulting costs from a war).

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP -- otherwise known as food stamps) and Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are very excellent programs to fight poverty.

On the state level, we need more inspectors to determine that corporations are meeting their quotas on equal opportunity hiring.

Most Favored Nation Status should be revamped to favor newly emerging democracies such as Bangladesh and struggling democracies such as Mexico. If there were not such a differential in wealth at our border with Mexico, there would not be a problem.

For tax reduction measures, we need to decrease our use of the military (reduce costs of wars) and quit trying to rebuild countries our military has destroyed. I reference the book "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin to support that idea.

FDR was right: Tax to the ability to pay.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Having slept poorly the night before and arrived to a cold classroom Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig High School student Irvin Kingbird, a senior, curled up with a blanket and pillow in the corner of the resource room to rest and get warm Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2014, at the Bug High School in Bena, MN.   Photo: David Joles, Star Tribune.

Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.

Recent Posts

  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.
  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.