American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Remember Coolidge: Get government out of the way!

File under: Chilean Social Scurity, FairTax, Personal Freedom and Responcibility, government, welfare, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Replicate the policies of President Calvin Coolidge, Jr. by eliminating most functions of government and getting it back to its core constitutional functions. Enforce the 10th Amendment! ("The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.")

Dealing with Cost:

1. Eliminate the Departments of Education, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs (VA), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor.

2. Eliminate or sunset duplicated services and regulation. For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HHS, VA and various divisions of the Department of Agriculture all do the same thing.

3. Replace "providing services" with "funding services" via vouchers or tax credits or both. Then cap the vouchers or credits and sunset them.

4. Commencing with workers under 40 years old, phase in Social Security reform using the Chilean/Galveston paradigm with two-thirds of their Social Security contribution going into their own individual account, similar to federal employees' Thrift Savings Plan. The remaining one-third goes to fund the existing ponzi scheme until existing and soon-to-be beneficiaries die out.

In 25 years, today's 40-year-olds would look to their own individual accounts, payable in an annuity pay out based on actuary tables. The balance when they die would remain part of each worker's estate, going to their children or charities. Within two generations, poverty could be almost eliminated. (Chile went from 40 percent poverty in the 1960s to less than 5 percent today -- two generations of inheriting their parents' lifetime social security balances.

Dealing with revenue:

Replace our complex and punitive tax code with a simple, national, retail sales tax: FairTax HR-25, which already has over five dozen cosponsors in the current Congress -- five times more than any other pending tax reform bill.

Okay... what's your next problem?


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.