American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Remember Coolidge: Get government out of the way!

File under: Chilean Social Scurity, FairTax, Personal Freedom and Responcibility, government, welfare, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Replicate the policies of President Calvin Coolidge, Jr. by eliminating most functions of government and getting it back to its core constitutional functions. Enforce the 10th Amendment! ("The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.")

Dealing with Cost:

1. Eliminate the Departments of Education, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs (VA), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor.

2. Eliminate or sunset duplicated services and regulation. For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HHS, VA and various divisions of the Department of Agriculture all do the same thing.

3. Replace "providing services" with "funding services" via vouchers or tax credits or both. Then cap the vouchers or credits and sunset them.

4. Commencing with workers under 40 years old, phase in Social Security reform using the Chilean/Galveston paradigm with two-thirds of their Social Security contribution going into their own individual account, similar to federal employees' Thrift Savings Plan. The remaining one-third goes to fund the existing ponzi scheme until existing and soon-to-be beneficiaries die out.

In 25 years, today's 40-year-olds would look to their own individual accounts, payable in an annuity pay out based on actuary tables. The balance when they die would remain part of each worker's estate, going to their children or charities. Within two generations, poverty could be almost eliminated. (Chile went from 40 percent poverty in the 1960s to less than 5 percent today -- two generations of inheriting their parents' lifetime social security balances.

Dealing with revenue:

Replace our complex and punitive tax code with a simple, national, retail sales tax: FairTax HR-25, which already has over five dozen cosponsors in the current Congress -- five times more than any other pending tax reform bill.

Okay... what's your next problem?


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.