American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

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    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
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    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Remember Coolidge: Get government out of the way!

File under: Chilean Social Scurity, FairTax, Personal Freedom and Responcibility, government, welfare, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Replicate the policies of President Calvin Coolidge, Jr. by eliminating most functions of government and getting it back to its core constitutional functions. Enforce the 10th Amendment! ("The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.")

Dealing with Cost:

1. Eliminate the Departments of Education, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs (VA), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor.

2. Eliminate or sunset duplicated services and regulation. For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HHS, VA and various divisions of the Department of Agriculture all do the same thing.

3. Replace "providing services" with "funding services" via vouchers or tax credits or both. Then cap the vouchers or credits and sunset them.

4. Commencing with workers under 40 years old, phase in Social Security reform using the Chilean/Galveston paradigm with two-thirds of their Social Security contribution going into their own individual account, similar to federal employees' Thrift Savings Plan. The remaining one-third goes to fund the existing ponzi scheme until existing and soon-to-be beneficiaries die out.

In 25 years, today's 40-year-olds would look to their own individual accounts, payable in an annuity pay out based on actuary tables. The balance when they die would remain part of each worker's estate, going to their children or charities. Within two generations, poverty could be almost eliminated. (Chile went from 40 percent poverty in the 1960s to less than 5 percent today -- two generations of inheriting their parents' lifetime social security balances.

Dealing with revenue:

Replace our complex and punitive tax code with a simple, national, retail sales tax: FairTax HR-25, which already has over five dozen cosponsors in the current Congress -- five times more than any other pending tax reform bill.

Okay... what's your next problem?


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.