American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Remember Coolidge: Get government out of the way!

File under: Chilean Social Scurity, FairTax, Personal Freedom and Responcibility, government, welfare, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Replicate the policies of President Calvin Coolidge, Jr. by eliminating most functions of government and getting it back to its core constitutional functions. Enforce the 10th Amendment! ("The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.")

Dealing with Cost:

1. Eliminate the Departments of Education, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs (VA), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor.

2. Eliminate or sunset duplicated services and regulation. For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HHS, VA and various divisions of the Department of Agriculture all do the same thing.

3. Replace "providing services" with "funding services" via vouchers or tax credits or both. Then cap the vouchers or credits and sunset them.

4. Commencing with workers under 40 years old, phase in Social Security reform using the Chilean/Galveston paradigm with two-thirds of their Social Security contribution going into their own individual account, similar to federal employees' Thrift Savings Plan. The remaining one-third goes to fund the existing ponzi scheme until existing and soon-to-be beneficiaries die out.

In 25 years, today's 40-year-olds would look to their own individual accounts, payable in an annuity pay out based on actuary tables. The balance when they die would remain part of each worker's estate, going to their children or charities. Within two generations, poverty could be almost eliminated. (Chile went from 40 percent poverty in the 1960s to less than 5 percent today -- two generations of inheriting their parents' lifetime social security balances.

Dealing with revenue:

Replace our complex and punitive tax code with a simple, national, retail sales tax: FairTax HR-25, which already has over five dozen cosponsors in the current Congress -- five times more than any other pending tax reform bill.

Okay... what's your next problem?


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.