American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Remember Coolidge: Get government out of the way!

File under: Chilean Social Scurity, FairTax, Personal Freedom and Responcibility, government, welfare, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Replicate the policies of President Calvin Coolidge, Jr. by eliminating most functions of government and getting it back to its core constitutional functions. Enforce the 10th Amendment! ("The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.")

Dealing with Cost:

1. Eliminate the Departments of Education, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs (VA), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor.

2. Eliminate or sunset duplicated services and regulation. For example, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HHS, VA and various divisions of the Department of Agriculture all do the same thing.

3. Replace "providing services" with "funding services" via vouchers or tax credits or both. Then cap the vouchers or credits and sunset them.

4. Commencing with workers under 40 years old, phase in Social Security reform using the Chilean/Galveston paradigm with two-thirds of their Social Security contribution going into their own individual account, similar to federal employees' Thrift Savings Plan. The remaining one-third goes to fund the existing ponzi scheme until existing and soon-to-be beneficiaries die out.

In 25 years, today's 40-year-olds would look to their own individual accounts, payable in an annuity pay out based on actuary tables. The balance when they die would remain part of each worker's estate, going to their children or charities. Within two generations, poverty could be almost eliminated. (Chile went from 40 percent poverty in the 1960s to less than 5 percent today -- two generations of inheriting their parents' lifetime social security balances.

Dealing with revenue:

Replace our complex and punitive tax code with a simple, national, retail sales tax: FairTax HR-25, which already has over five dozen cosponsors in the current Congress -- five times more than any other pending tax reform bill.

Okay... what's your next problem?


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.