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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

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  • 04.28.16

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    "Welcome to our world." Educators take an entire school day to shadow a student and walk in their shoes. We find out how it went for one teacher.
  • 04.21.16

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Target poverty wages

File under: fair pay, living wage, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Kris J., Williston, OH

People who are forced to earn poverty wages do not contribute to a prosperous America. They are the working poor. Companies that pay these poor wages are undermining the prosperity of our nation. Yet the government contracts with these very companies for services and products. The government should insist that any company that gets a government contract must pay all its workers a fair living wage. "Jobs Well Done," a special report in the October 2010 issue of "The American Prospect," spells out this problem in several major industries (e.g., agriculture, food, trucking) and how living wages would be good for everyone, and in the end, reduce costs -- even if prices might rise modestly. These workers provide essential services. Do they not deserve fair pay? It is hard to understand how anyone can think that a race to the bottom caused by deregulation and lack of enforcement is of benefit to our economy.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 05.05.16

    Should Colleges Teach Men How to Be Men?

    Should colleges have men's studies majors or men's resource centers? Our guest this week tells us that male college students would get better grades if they rejected stereotypes of hyper-masculinity.
  • 04.28.16

    “My Frain is Bried”: Shadowing a Student

    "Welcome to our world." Educators take an entire school day to shadow a student and walk in their shoes. We find out how it went for one teacher.
  • 04.21.16

    High School Job Prep

    Want a job? So does every student ever! Maybe career and technical education classes are the way to go. Shaun Dougherty says you could be more likely to graduate and earn more if you do.
  • 04.14.16

    How Tutoring Helps Students

    Private tutoring is no longer just for the rich kids. Our guest tells us how the individual attention improves student learning and graduation rates.