American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Target poverty wages

File under: fair pay, living wage, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Kris J., Williston, OH

People who are forced to earn poverty wages do not contribute to a prosperous America. They are the working poor. Companies that pay these poor wages are undermining the prosperity of our nation. Yet the government contracts with these very companies for services and products. The government should insist that any company that gets a government contract must pay all its workers a fair living wage. "Jobs Well Done," a special report in the October 2010 issue of "The American Prospect," spells out this problem in several major industries (e.g., agriculture, food, trucking) and how living wages would be good for everyone, and in the end, reduce costs -- even if prices might rise modestly. These workers provide essential services. Do they not deserve fair pay? It is hard to understand how anyone can think that a race to the bottom caused by deregulation and lack of enforcement is of benefit to our economy.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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  • 06.28.16

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    We have a new name for our podcast! We'll still dive into new ideas and research on how we learn and how we teach.
  • 06.23.16

    Merging Small, Rural School Districts

    Small, rural schools around the country are closing. Our guest says that could actually be a good thing.
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    Fighting for ‘Our School’

    What's the role of a school in a rural town? We begin our series on rural schools by looking at a state where the fight has been particularly fierce: Vermont.
  • 05.26.16

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    Our guest says the so-called 'invisible tax' on teachers of color leads to burnout at a time when teachers of color are already leaving the profession more quickly than their white colleagues.