American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Learn to manage a bank account

File under: financial literacy and education, personalfinance

0 (0 votes)

From: Frank V., Mahtomedi, MN

Most people get some sort of assistance from the government, Social Security, private agencies, or churches and other religious organizations. People receiving assistance should be opted in to a credit union account like the new 401(k) opt in accounts. This way they can learn to manage their money, have access to the resources of the credit union, and have a non-profit advocate to help them with their day-to-day financial issues instead of being forced to use a check cashing operation that charges very high interest and fees just to cash a check. It keeps money in the community, and actually helps people learn about finances from an organization that is run by its members and chartered by our government.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.16

    Fighting for ‘Our School’

    What's the role of a school in a rural town? We begin our series on rural schools by looking at a state where the fight has been particularly fierce: Vermont.
  • 06.09.16

    How Do We Learn Better: Digital or Print?

    Do you understand facts better online or in print? New research has massive implications for teaching in the 21st century.
  • 06.02.16

    Theological Schools Feel the Squeeze

    Theological schools are straining for cash as they suffer from drops in enrollment over the past few years. Our guest tells us how they are dealing with it.
  • 05.26.16

    The ‘Invisible Tax’ on Teachers of Color

    Our guest says the so-called 'invisible tax' on teachers of color leads to burnout at a time when teachers of color are already leaving the profession more quickly than their white colleagues.