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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Stop redefining poverty for political reasons

File under: gerrymandering, politics, evil, manipulation, bread and circuses, public perception

0 (0 votes)

From: Matt E., Fargo, ND

Since some part of the increase in those considered to be below the poverty level has to do with specious and politically motivated redefinitions of the poverty line, there's no reason that a different set of politicians couldn't just redefine the poverty line and "poverty" to mean something else. Moving the poverty line up or down isn't meaningful.

The fact of the matter is that the majority of Americans of any income level are better off today than they were in 1968. People, even many below the poverty line, have safer cars that last longer and harm the environment less. They have air conditioners that use less electricity and let people live more comfortably. They have better medicines, and they have cheaper access to better vaccines and subsidized health.

Since every time we declare war on something in this country, we funnel lots of money into fighting it but only manage to make the problem bigger, perhaps we should just officially declare war on prosperity.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photo: Daniel Buchanan

How to help students hope

A polling expert finds students less engaged with school as they get older. Brandon Busteed from Gallup Education says if schools taught to strengths instead of weaknesses, more students would be successful in school and in life.

Recent Posts

  • 10.21.14

    Making it stick

    Why do we remember some things, and forget others? That's what author Peter Brown and psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel set out to answer in their new book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.
  • 10.14.14

    What teachers need

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with author Elizabeth Green about her new book, Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone).
  • 10.07.14

    Intelligence is achievable and other lessons from The Teacher Wars

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford continues her conversation with Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars.
  • 10.01.14

    Teaching: The most embattled profession

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with bestselling author Dana Goldstein about her new book, The Teacher Wars.