American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide free or affordable counseling

File under: mental health care, health

0 (0 votes)

From: Patrice M., Homewood, IL

As a clinical social worker, I often see people who may be overwhelmed with managing emotional, psychological, family or work stresses that result in their inability to "get ahead." These are folks who are dealing with multiple stressors and have few supports. And, many people who are willing to go to counseling to get the support they need to deal with these stressors, cannot afford to go to counseling. There really is no such thing as free counseling, as far as I see, and the waiting list to receive assistance through a community mental health center is months long.

When I'm trying to find support for someone who needs immediate assistance (and cannot pay the full price of counseling out of pocket), I'm often advised to tell that person to go to the emergency room where they can get immediate psychiatric care. But this is not for ongoing care and support. Many folks with health insurance still do not want to pay a $40 copay a week, and those with public aid are lucky to find a counselor who would accept public aid, as counselors themselves cannot afford to wait months to get reimbursed by state.

Having counseling available to children and teens at school, would also be nice, as personal and family stressors often add an unnecessary distraction that results in poor performance and grades in school. What about a counseling center at each school -- available to kids and their families? Or a community mental health center in every town? Maybe having better access to services, would reduce stigma as well.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.