American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide free or affordable counseling

File under: mental health care, health

0 (0 votes)

From: Patrice M., Homewood, IL

As a clinical social worker, I often see people who may be overwhelmed with managing emotional, psychological, family or work stresses that result in their inability to "get ahead." These are folks who are dealing with multiple stressors and have few supports. And, many people who are willing to go to counseling to get the support they need to deal with these stressors, cannot afford to go to counseling. There really is no such thing as free counseling, as far as I see, and the waiting list to receive assistance through a community mental health center is months long.

When I'm trying to find support for someone who needs immediate assistance (and cannot pay the full price of counseling out of pocket), I'm often advised to tell that person to go to the emergency room where they can get immediate psychiatric care. But this is not for ongoing care and support. Many folks with health insurance still do not want to pay a $40 copay a week, and those with public aid are lucky to find a counselor who would accept public aid, as counselors themselves cannot afford to wait months to get reimbursed by state.

Having counseling available to children and teens at school, would also be nice, as personal and family stressors often add an unnecessary distraction that results in poor performance and grades in school. What about a counseling center at each school -- available to kids and their families? Or a community mental health center in every town? Maybe having better access to services, would reduce stigma as well.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.