American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can’t find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

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  • 09.11.14

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    The troubled history of vocational education

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide mobile-accessible bank accounts and graduated social services; reduce program bureaucracy

File under: banking, taxes, security, identity, simplify, welfare, technology

0 (0 votes)

From: Greg H., Roseville, MN

1) Revise tax law to eliminate any taxes on savings for individuals earning at or below three times the federal poverty level. This will help get people up and moving.

2) Provide a state bank account to everyone who cannot get a private sector bank account. This would be used for saving money and being able to deposit paychecks. Lack of a bank account due to changing addresses and employment status puts some people at the mercy of payday lenders and the vicious cycle of never ending loan payments.

3) Provide a cell phone-based mechanism for people in poverty to transfer credit and money from their bank. (It's working in Africa!)

4) Revise social services from the "either you get it or you don't" model to the graduated, tapering-off model. Many folks suffer from having to remain in poverty to keep one or two critical social services benefits that low paying jobs don't provide and that they require to keep a job (for example health care for a chronic illness). Often, when they get a job, their new income eliminates their qualification for all social services even though that income isn't enough to cover food, daycare, transportation, and other expenses. Give them partial coverage for daycare, health care, or other needs. Help them succeed.

5) Embed more identity security technology in the social services distribution system to prevent fraudulent double-dipping. That would free up resources for real need.

6) Reduce overhead and redundant bureaucracy by decreasing the number of programs and organizations, and managing programs centrally. This would push more program dollars to the people who need them.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can’t find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.