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Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

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    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pull together to support our government

File under: grass roots, reach out, community, no blame, understanding, other

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From: PeggyAnn D., Bucksport, ME

I was hit with poverty during Bush's reign. It was coming due to the previous trickle down system. I lived in an area where the very wealthy reside in summer. The unfairness was so apparent. I come from an upper middle class family and attended Smith College successfully. "How could you be hungry?" people would ask me.

For five years, it became increasingly savage, and I was blamed by the rich and not so rich alike. I experienced the guilt, shame, and inertness that goes with poverty, and especially the isolation which leads to helplessness.

I believe in Obama. I also think he inherited a seat that is near impossible to captain. I never would have suggested grassroots outreach and help to Bush or Reagan, because we would have been used to keep the power where it was. Obama needs help to help us. I was hungry, cold and alone the night he won the election, and I sobbed. I felt hope.

I believe that under this current administration, any move we make to help ourselves, will help create a ripple effect that would be powerful and appreciated in Washington. We have to get together! I am ready.

Before I lost my farm, I wanted to ride on horseback across the country in a positive note of supporting the administration. Unfortunately, I am now too poor.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.