American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pull together to support our government

File under: grass roots, reach out, community, no blame, understanding, other

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From: PeggyAnn D., Bucksport, ME

I was hit with poverty during Bush's reign. It was coming due to the previous trickle down system. I lived in an area where the very wealthy reside in summer. The unfairness was so apparent. I come from an upper middle class family and attended Smith College successfully. "How could you be hungry?" people would ask me.

For five years, it became increasingly savage, and I was blamed by the rich and not so rich alike. I experienced the guilt, shame, and inertness that goes with poverty, and especially the isolation which leads to helplessness.

I believe in Obama. I also think he inherited a seat that is near impossible to captain. I never would have suggested grassroots outreach and help to Bush or Reagan, because we would have been used to keep the power where it was. Obama needs help to help us. I was hungry, cold and alone the night he won the election, and I sobbed. I felt hope.

I believe that under this current administration, any move we make to help ourselves, will help create a ripple effect that would be powerful and appreciated in Washington. We have to get together! I am ready.

Before I lost my farm, I wanted to ride on horseback across the country in a positive note of supporting the administration. Unfortunately, I am now too poor.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.