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Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Institute an alternate economic system

File under: Alternate economy, social capitalism, social currency, knowledge asset, education, mentorship, social entrepreneur, small business, social media, other

4 (6 votes)

From: Daniel R., Edmonds, WA

The Ingenesist Project specifies an alternate economy that closely resembles market capitalism except that factors of production are not land, labor, and financial capital. They are social, creative, and intellectual capital. These are the things that social entrepreneurs will allocate in the production of goods and services. This is called "Social Capitalism."

Social capitalism requires a standardized (normalized) community knowledge inventory and a social media application that allows millions of social entrepreneurs to match most worthy knowledge surplus with most worthy knowledge deficit within a geographical area (i.e., a neighborhood or community).

Since we use the same calculus as Wall Street, we can estimate the likelihood that an entrepreneur will return a social profit. All predicted social profits can be combined into a social "cash" flow and securitized as innovation bonds. The innovation bonds will be traded as a social currency to hedge the dollar.

Debt is a promise against future productivity. The innovation bond is also a promise against future productivity. Therefore, an innovation bond and debt denominated dollar would be fully convertible. That would end poverty in a hurry. Please see the Ingenesist website for an informative video series.


Comments:

Keith A.
From , IL

So . . . people should . . . THINK food onto the table? I fail to see how your "social capitalism" will feed, clothe or house people who lack these things.


Dan R.
From Seattle, WA

@Kieth A; Yes, people will think and food, clothes, houses, airplanes, and software will get produced. How do you believe that happens now...bankers? Ingenesist is an exact duplicate of the same exact system that can now read a strip of magnetic carbon laminated to a piece of plastic which allows you to carry groceries out of a store. The exception are "the factors of production" If you don't understand how that system works, it will be difficult for you to understand how The Ingenesist Project will accomplish the exact same outcome, except where the human is the item of permanence rather than the environment, machinery, and a debt based currency.


American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.