American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Institute an alternate economic system

File under: Alternate economy, social capitalism, social currency, knowledge asset, education, mentorship, social entrepreneur, small business, social media, other

4 (6 votes)

From: Daniel R., Edmonds, WA

The Ingenesist Project specifies an alternate economy that closely resembles market capitalism except that factors of production are not land, labor, and financial capital. They are social, creative, and intellectual capital. These are the things that social entrepreneurs will allocate in the production of goods and services. This is called "Social Capitalism."

Social capitalism requires a standardized (normalized) community knowledge inventory and a social media application that allows millions of social entrepreneurs to match most worthy knowledge surplus with most worthy knowledge deficit within a geographical area (i.e., a neighborhood or community).

Since we use the same calculus as Wall Street, we can estimate the likelihood that an entrepreneur will return a social profit. All predicted social profits can be combined into a social "cash" flow and securitized as innovation bonds. The innovation bonds will be traded as a social currency to hedge the dollar.

Debt is a promise against future productivity. The innovation bond is also a promise against future productivity. Therefore, an innovation bond and debt denominated dollar would be fully convertible. That would end poverty in a hurry. Please see the Ingenesist website for an informative video series.


Comments:

Keith A.
From , IL

So . . . people should . . . THINK food onto the table? I fail to see how your "social capitalism" will feed, clothe or house people who lack these things.


Dan R.
From Seattle, WA

@Kieth A; Yes, people will think and food, clothes, houses, airplanes, and software will get produced. How do you believe that happens now...bankers? Ingenesist is an exact duplicate of the same exact system that can now read a strip of magnetic carbon laminated to a piece of plastic which allows you to carry groceries out of a store. The exception are "the factors of production" If you don't understand how that system works, it will be difficult for you to understand how The Ingenesist Project will accomplish the exact same outcome, except where the human is the item of permanence rather than the environment, machinery, and a debt based currency.


American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.16

    Fighting for ‘Our School’

    What's the role of a school in a rural town? We begin our series on rural schools by looking at a state where the fight has been particularly fierce: Vermont.
  • 06.09.16

    How Do We Learn Better: Digital or Print?

    Do you understand facts better online or in print? New research has massive implications for teaching in the 21st century.
  • 06.02.16

    Theological Schools Feel the Squeeze

    Theological schools are straining for cash as they suffer from drops in enrollment over the past few years. Our guest tells us how they are dealing with it.
  • 05.26.16

    The ‘Invisible Tax’ on Teachers of Color

    Our guest says the so-called 'invisible tax' on teachers of color leads to burnout at a time when teachers of color are already leaving the profession more quickly than their white colleagues.