American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Institute an alternate economic system

File under: Alternate economy, social capitalism, social currency, knowledge asset, education, mentorship, social entrepreneur, small business, social media, other

4 (6 votes)

From: Daniel R., Edmonds, WA

The Ingenesist Project specifies an alternate economy that closely resembles market capitalism except that factors of production are not land, labor, and financial capital. They are social, creative, and intellectual capital. These are the things that social entrepreneurs will allocate in the production of goods and services. This is called "Social Capitalism."

Social capitalism requires a standardized (normalized) community knowledge inventory and a social media application that allows millions of social entrepreneurs to match most worthy knowledge surplus with most worthy knowledge deficit within a geographical area (i.e., a neighborhood or community).

Since we use the same calculus as Wall Street, we can estimate the likelihood that an entrepreneur will return a social profit. All predicted social profits can be combined into a social "cash" flow and securitized as innovation bonds. The innovation bonds will be traded as a social currency to hedge the dollar.

Debt is a promise against future productivity. The innovation bond is also a promise against future productivity. Therefore, an innovation bond and debt denominated dollar would be fully convertible. That would end poverty in a hurry. Please see the Ingenesist website for an informative video series.


Comments:

Keith A.
From , IL

So . . . people should . . . THINK food onto the table? I fail to see how your "social capitalism" will feed, clothe or house people who lack these things.


Dan R.
From Seattle, WA

@Kieth A; Yes, people will think and food, clothes, houses, airplanes, and software will get produced. How do you believe that happens now...bankers? Ingenesist is an exact duplicate of the same exact system that can now read a strip of magnetic carbon laminated to a piece of plastic which allows you to carry groceries out of a store. The exception are "the factors of production" If you don't understand how that system works, it will be difficult for you to understand how The Ingenesist Project will accomplish the exact same outcome, except where the human is the item of permanence rather than the environment, machinery, and a debt based currency.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

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