American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Institute an alternate economic system

File under: Alternate economy, social capitalism, social currency, knowledge asset, education, mentorship, social entrepreneur, small business, social media, other

4 (6 votes)

From: Daniel R., Edmonds, WA

The Ingenesist Project specifies an alternate economy that closely resembles market capitalism except that factors of production are not land, labor, and financial capital. They are social, creative, and intellectual capital. These are the things that social entrepreneurs will allocate in the production of goods and services. This is called "Social Capitalism."

Social capitalism requires a standardized (normalized) community knowledge inventory and a social media application that allows millions of social entrepreneurs to match most worthy knowledge surplus with most worthy knowledge deficit within a geographical area (i.e., a neighborhood or community).

Since we use the same calculus as Wall Street, we can estimate the likelihood that an entrepreneur will return a social profit. All predicted social profits can be combined into a social "cash" flow and securitized as innovation bonds. The innovation bonds will be traded as a social currency to hedge the dollar.

Debt is a promise against future productivity. The innovation bond is also a promise against future productivity. Therefore, an innovation bond and debt denominated dollar would be fully convertible. That would end poverty in a hurry. Please see the Ingenesist website for an informative video series.


Comments:

Keith A.
From , IL

So . . . people should . . . THINK food onto the table? I fail to see how your "social capitalism" will feed, clothe or house people who lack these things.


Dan R.
From Seattle, WA

@Kieth A; Yes, people will think and food, clothes, houses, airplanes, and software will get produced. How do you believe that happens now...bankers? Ingenesist is an exact duplicate of the same exact system that can now read a strip of magnetic carbon laminated to a piece of plastic which allows you to carry groceries out of a store. The exception are "the factors of production" If you don't understand how that system works, it will be difficult for you to understand how The Ingenesist Project will accomplish the exact same outcome, except where the human is the item of permanence rather than the environment, machinery, and a debt based currency.


American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.