American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Raise the poverty line, implement protectionist tariffs, and institute employee representation in corporate decision making

File under: job creation, poverty line, basic budget, employee representation, tariffs, manufacturing, industrial policy, technology, jobs, taxes, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Keith A., , IL

High poverty and high unemployment aren't an anomaly. They're the natural state of affairs in a backward economy. In the United States, they're a warning sign that our economy is regressing. This isn't a recession -- it's a regression.

Without a basic standard of living, people lack the security, flexibility and opportunity to make good long-term economic decisions. Therefore, redefine the poverty line to account for increases in the costs of housing, transportation, health care and child care (read more here), and distribute the benefits of entitlement programs accordingly. Pay for them with a steeper marginal tax rate on luxury-level income (60 percent on income over $175,000 a year for single filers, $300,000 a year for joint filers).

But transfer payments alone are a drag on the economy. Therefore, put in place an aggressive national industrial policy focused on two things: advanced technology (especially in nano and green energy) and domestic production of goods for domestic consumption. If we can't compete head-to-head with slave-labor wages in China and other nations, then we have to accept the necessity of temporary protectionist tariffs as a defensive measure while our productive capacity regenerates.

Finally, amend corporate law to require German-style employee representation in corporate governance, to ensure that companies are run with the interests of all stakeholders in mind, not just to maximize profit for stockholders and executives. This should result in fairer employee compensation as well as more reinvestment of earnings in research and development.


Comments:

Keith A.
From , IL

Two addenda: There is so much work in this country that needs to be done, and so many people who need work, the obvious problem is figuring out how to pay the latter to do the former. This is where a WPA-style work program would be extremely useful in the short term, especially considering the deplorable state of our national transportation and utility infrastructure. Also, the single biggest roadblock against job creation right now is big banks' unwillingness to lend money to small businesses and startups. Therefore, either the Federal Reserve or a public-private small-commercial bank should lend directly to these businesses so that they can create the jobs we need. Capitalism has a major role to play in our recovery, but our biggest capitalists are refusing to cooperate. Cut them out of the deal.


American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.