American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Increase jobs

File under: jobs, job creation, consumer demand

0 (0 votes)

From: Ron B., Boston, MA

Four ways to increase jobs:

1. Remove the link between health insurance and employment by expanding Medicare to cover everyone. This would decrease the per employee cost to the employer, and free up resources to hire more workers.

2. Decrease the work week to four days per week. Employers would hire new workers to fill in on the fifth day.

3. Mandate, via a progressive income tax policy, that the lowest paid worker must make at least one-fortieth (1/40) of the highest paid employee in the company. This would insure that improving company profits would result in higher wages for all workers, thereby increasing their disposable income and increasing consumer demand.

4. Rewrite tax policy to discourage offshoring of jobs.


Comments:

Jim N.
From Nisswa, MN

Look, I'm no economist, but we need to recapture jobs that were here 10 years ago that have now gone to China. I've worked in advertising/marketing for over 25 years and I have personally witnessed American companies that were making their products proudly here. Now, to remain competitive "had" to have their products made in China. There needs to be incentives/tax breaks for U.S. companies that remain/switch back producing products here. This would produce real full time jobs (not the temporary jobs that are being created/boasted as successful jobs being created now). I also realize that on the retail side, prices would be higher but we wouldn't have to worry about lead-based painted toys or faulty dangerous drywall etc. because it would be regulated here. And I know I sound like my dad when I say this, there was a day where "Made in the U.S.A. meant something. It used to mean it was made better because we made it. We need to start again make things proudly here with no apologies. My two cents... By the way, during these economic times how does a award winning creative who excelled in my profession for over 25 years find himself laid off and can't find a job? Sad indeed.


American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.