American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Increase jobs

File under: jobs, job creation, consumer demand

0 (0 votes)

From: Ron B., Boston, MA

Four ways to increase jobs:

1. Remove the link between health insurance and employment by expanding Medicare to cover everyone. This would decrease the per employee cost to the employer, and free up resources to hire more workers.

2. Decrease the work week to four days per week. Employers would hire new workers to fill in on the fifth day.

3. Mandate, via a progressive income tax policy, that the lowest paid worker must make at least one-fortieth (1/40) of the highest paid employee in the company. This would insure that improving company profits would result in higher wages for all workers, thereby increasing their disposable income and increasing consumer demand.

4. Rewrite tax policy to discourage offshoring of jobs.


Comments:

Jim N.
From Nisswa, MN

Look, I'm no economist, but we need to recapture jobs that were here 10 years ago that have now gone to China. I've worked in advertising/marketing for over 25 years and I have personally witnessed American companies that were making their products proudly here. Now, to remain competitive "had" to have their products made in China. There needs to be incentives/tax breaks for U.S. companies that remain/switch back producing products here. This would produce real full time jobs (not the temporary jobs that are being created/boasted as successful jobs being created now). I also realize that on the retail side, prices would be higher but we wouldn't have to worry about lead-based painted toys or faulty dangerous drywall etc. because it would be regulated here. And I know I sound like my dad when I say this, there was a day where "Made in the U.S.A. meant something. It used to mean it was made better because we made it. We need to start again make things proudly here with no apologies. My two cents... By the way, during these economic times how does a award winning creative who excelled in my profession for over 25 years find himself laid off and can't find a job? Sad indeed.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 04.28.16

    “My Frain is Bried”: Shadowing a Student

    "Welcome to our world." Educators take an entire school day to shadow a student and walk in their shoes. We find out how it went for one teacher.
  • 04.21.16

    High School Job Prep

    Want a job? So does every student ever! Maybe career and technical education classes are the way to go. Shaun Dougherty says you could be more likely to graduate and earn more if you do.
  • 04.14.16

    How Tutoring Helps Students

    Private tutoring is no longer just for the rich kids. Our guest tells us how the individual attention improves student learning and graduation rates.
  • 04.07.16

    Is Advanced Math Necessary?

    In our last episode, Andrew Hacker argued that math courses like algebra are unnecessary for most high schoolers. This week's guest couldn't disagree more.