American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Increase jobs

File under: jobs, job creation, consumer demand

0 (0 votes)

From: Ron B., Boston, MA

Four ways to increase jobs:

1. Remove the link between health insurance and employment by expanding Medicare to cover everyone. This would decrease the per employee cost to the employer, and free up resources to hire more workers.

2. Decrease the work week to four days per week. Employers would hire new workers to fill in on the fifth day.

3. Mandate, via a progressive income tax policy, that the lowest paid worker must make at least one-fortieth (1/40) of the highest paid employee in the company. This would insure that improving company profits would result in higher wages for all workers, thereby increasing their disposable income and increasing consumer demand.

4. Rewrite tax policy to discourage offshoring of jobs.


Comments:

Jim N.
From Nisswa, MN

Look, I'm no economist, but we need to recapture jobs that were here 10 years ago that have now gone to China. I've worked in advertising/marketing for over 25 years and I have personally witnessed American companies that were making their products proudly here. Now, to remain competitive "had" to have their products made in China. There needs to be incentives/tax breaks for U.S. companies that remain/switch back producing products here. This would produce real full time jobs (not the temporary jobs that are being created/boasted as successful jobs being created now). I also realize that on the retail side, prices would be higher but we wouldn't have to worry about lead-based painted toys or faulty dangerous drywall etc. because it would be regulated here. And I know I sound like my dad when I say this, there was a day where "Made in the U.S.A. meant something. It used to mean it was made better because we made it. We need to start again make things proudly here with no apologies. My two cents... By the way, during these economic times how does a award winning creative who excelled in my profession for over 25 years find himself laid off and can't find a job? Sad indeed.


American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.16

    Victims, not criminals: Rebranding teen sex trafficking

    The nation is changing the way it thinks about teen sex trafficking. States have decriminalized it for teens and offered help, and some are attacking the demand for commercial sex.
  • 05.12.16

    Numbers elusive when it comes to trafficking

    Estimating the number of human trafficking victims in the United States is notoriously difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    India: Delivering water by hand

    In much of India, getting enough water is a low-tech affair. In some places, women draw water by hand; in others suicide rates among farmers have risen because drought and dropping water tables make their lives difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    Israel: Using technology, engineering to cut reliance on Galilee

    Water has been a matter of national security for Israel since the nation's inception. Drought and growth have pushed the country to use desalination, wastewater recycling and other technology and engineering feats to address the demand. But it's a different picture where Palestinians are involved.