American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Increase jobs

File under: jobs, job creation, consumer demand

0 (0 votes)

From: Ron B., Boston, MA

Four ways to increase jobs:

1. Remove the link between health insurance and employment by expanding Medicare to cover everyone. This would decrease the per employee cost to the employer, and free up resources to hire more workers.

2. Decrease the work week to four days per week. Employers would hire new workers to fill in on the fifth day.

3. Mandate, via a progressive income tax policy, that the lowest paid worker must make at least one-fortieth (1/40) of the highest paid employee in the company. This would insure that improving company profits would result in higher wages for all workers, thereby increasing their disposable income and increasing consumer demand.

4. Rewrite tax policy to discourage offshoring of jobs.


Comments:

Jim N.
From Nisswa, MN

Look, I'm no economist, but we need to recapture jobs that were here 10 years ago that have now gone to China. I've worked in advertising/marketing for over 25 years and I have personally witnessed American companies that were making their products proudly here. Now, to remain competitive "had" to have their products made in China. There needs to be incentives/tax breaks for U.S. companies that remain/switch back producing products here. This would produce real full time jobs (not the temporary jobs that are being created/boasted as successful jobs being created now). I also realize that on the retail side, prices would be higher but we wouldn't have to worry about lead-based painted toys or faulty dangerous drywall etc. because it would be regulated here. And I know I sound like my dad when I say this, there was a day where "Made in the U.S.A. meant something. It used to mean it was made better because we made it. We need to start again make things proudly here with no apologies. My two cents... By the way, during these economic times how does a award winning creative who excelled in my profession for over 25 years find himself laid off and can't find a job? Sad indeed.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.