American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide resources for new, single moms -- and advertise them

File under: education, mentoring, mothers, children, poverty, transition, single moms

0 (0 votes)

From: Cori R., Salt Lake City, UT

As a newly single mother, I didn't know what help was available in the community. I was unable to find a job or housing. I needed job skills and a work history that my caring for my kids had not given me. It felt hopeless.

We need to establish community-based programs for newly single mothers. Let's assign them a mentor who helps them find resources and legal assistance, as well as job training, child care, housing etc. -- or, perhaps even provide those things. These mentors could also help single moms register for skill training, colleges or useful certificate programs through public (not private) institutions. As the moms transition into a career, they could continue to get help or advice from a mentor in their chosen field.

Single moms who live in poverty are much more likely to have children who live in poverty as adults. A little help when young women are faltering can prevent them from making horrible mistakes with permanent, life changing consequences.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.