American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

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  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.
  • 05.28.15

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide resources for new, single moms -- and advertise them

File under: education, mentoring, mothers, children, poverty, transition, single moms

0 (0 votes)

From: Cori R., Salt Lake City, UT

As a newly single mother, I didn't know what help was available in the community. I was unable to find a job or housing. I needed job skills and a work history that my caring for my kids had not given me. It felt hopeless.

We need to establish community-based programs for newly single mothers. Let's assign them a mentor who helps them find resources and legal assistance, as well as job training, child care, housing etc. -- or, perhaps even provide those things. These mentors could also help single moms register for skill training, colleges or useful certificate programs through public (not private) institutions. As the moms transition into a career, they could continue to get help or advice from a mentor in their chosen field.

Single moms who live in poverty are much more likely to have children who live in poverty as adults. A little help when young women are faltering can prevent them from making horrible mistakes with permanent, life changing consequences.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.
  • 05.28.15

    Divestment on Campus

    Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?