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Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. Research shows bilingual people can have learning advantages over monolingual people. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Require social and emotional intelligence training in K-12 schools

File under: education

0 (0 votes)

From: Lorie W., Buffalo Grove, IL

Within my own family I have relatives that many would consider financially successful, and others that would be considered as being in need. One common denominator between both groups is their ability to make the best of the situation that they are in. The one difference between the groups, though, is that people in one believe they can be successful while those in the other feel that "success is for other people." I believe that poverty first occurs within a person's mind -- before it becomes reality.

There are families that operate on $20,000 dollars a year that have learned to work with their situation and there are others that make $100,000 plus a year and struggle day after day. If we had training from elementary through high school that focused on teaching people how to analyze, compare, reason, work in teams and deal with conflict, I believe people would have the tools necessary to have confidence in their ability to make a way, no matter how much work is necessary, to be productive in our society.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. Research shows bilingual people can have learning advantages over monolingual people. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

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  • 08.12.14

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    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

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    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

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    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.