American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide grants and tax breaks for worker-owned startups

File under: workplace democracy, profit sharing, local economy, taxes, other

5 (1 votes)

From: Robin P., Seattle, WA

Instead of clocking in for a small wage, all workers would take a salary and share in the wealth they generate. The profits would stay local and enrich the community. This has been proven successful in many 100% worker-owned businesses.

It is my dream to join or help launch a worker-owned startup business that would operate on democratic principles and share profits equitably. I believe small, locally-owned independent businesses are the backbone of the economy, and the key to making the American Dream come true for the majority of Americans. I am so tired of seeing how mega-corporations keep sucking up all the wealth generated by the lower and middle classes and delivering all their profits into the bloated pockets of a very select few. "Wage slavery" is wrong. Cooperatives and other worker-owned business models can revitalize our economy, if they become widespread. They would reduce the income gap and create a more healthy economy. They would also eliminate the need for government-administered socialism. Publicly and privately funded grants for worker-owned business can buy our country out of wage slavery, with far-reaching implications for sustainability and other social concerns. Read a great article on this subject.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.