American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide grants and tax breaks for worker-owned startups

File under: workplace democracy, profit sharing, local economy, taxes, other

5 (1 votes)

From: Robin P., Seattle, WA

Instead of clocking in for a small wage, all workers would take a salary and share in the wealth they generate. The profits would stay local and enrich the community. This has been proven successful in many 100% worker-owned businesses.

It is my dream to join or help launch a worker-owned startup business that would operate on democratic principles and share profits equitably. I believe small, locally-owned independent businesses are the backbone of the economy, and the key to making the American Dream come true for the majority of Americans. I am so tired of seeing how mega-corporations keep sucking up all the wealth generated by the lower and middle classes and delivering all their profits into the bloated pockets of a very select few. "Wage slavery" is wrong. Cooperatives and other worker-owned business models can revitalize our economy, if they become widespread. They would reduce the income gap and create a more healthy economy. They would also eliminate the need for government-administered socialism. Publicly and privately funded grants for worker-owned business can buy our country out of wage slavery, with far-reaching implications for sustainability and other social concerns. Read a great article on this subject.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.