American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide grants and tax breaks for worker-owned startups

File under: workplace democracy, profit sharing, local economy, taxes, other

5 (1 votes)

From: Robin P., Seattle, WA

Instead of clocking in for a small wage, all workers would take a salary and share in the wealth they generate. The profits would stay local and enrich the community. This has been proven successful in many 100% worker-owned businesses.

It is my dream to join or help launch a worker-owned startup business that would operate on democratic principles and share profits equitably. I believe small, locally-owned independent businesses are the backbone of the economy, and the key to making the American Dream come true for the majority of Americans. I am so tired of seeing how mega-corporations keep sucking up all the wealth generated by the lower and middle classes and delivering all their profits into the bloated pockets of a very select few. "Wage slavery" is wrong. Cooperatives and other worker-owned business models can revitalize our economy, if they become widespread. They would reduce the income gap and create a more healthy economy. They would also eliminate the need for government-administered socialism. Publicly and privately funded grants for worker-owned business can buy our country out of wage slavery, with far-reaching implications for sustainability and other social concerns. Read a great article on this subject.


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American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

Recent Posts

  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.
  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.