American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide grants and tax breaks for worker-owned startups

File under: workplace democracy, profit sharing, local economy, taxes, other

5 (1 votes)

From: Robin P., Seattle, WA

Instead of clocking in for a small wage, all workers would take a salary and share in the wealth they generate. The profits would stay local and enrich the community. This has been proven successful in many 100% worker-owned businesses.

It is my dream to join or help launch a worker-owned startup business that would operate on democratic principles and share profits equitably. I believe small, locally-owned independent businesses are the backbone of the economy, and the key to making the American Dream come true for the majority of Americans. I am so tired of seeing how mega-corporations keep sucking up all the wealth generated by the lower and middle classes and delivering all their profits into the bloated pockets of a very select few. "Wage slavery" is wrong. Cooperatives and other worker-owned business models can revitalize our economy, if they become widespread. They would reduce the income gap and create a more healthy economy. They would also eliminate the need for government-administered socialism. Publicly and privately funded grants for worker-owned business can buy our country out of wage slavery, with far-reaching implications for sustainability and other social concerns. Read a great article on this subject.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.