American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Read together as a family at home

File under: education, reading, literacy, breaking the cycle of poverty

4 (1 votes)

From: Mary H., Wilmington, DE

Encourage parents and guardians to read to their children as a family activity from birth through middle school. Children who are read to and talked to are better prepared for school and perform better in school.

Read to Them has created the One School One Book program to encourage families to read at home and encourage whole towns to become involved in reading aloud. This is an activity that can engage everyone in a family from infants to grandparents.

One of my most cherished memories is of a Christmas Day spent reading The Best Christmas Pageant with my husband, 9-year-old child, 80-year-old mother, and 78-year-old aunt. We all took turns reading a chapter, and laughed ourselves silly. Sadly, both of the older generation are gone now, but we all remember that day with great fondness.

Literacy is a key to financial success because good reading skills ensure educational success, which leads to better jobs and more permanent employment. Nowadays, even plumbers and electricians need a high degree of literacy. This idea will not lead to immediate poverty mitigation, but it will help break the cycle of poverty.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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  • 05.12.16

    Victims, not criminals: Rebranding teen sex trafficking

    The nation is changing the way it thinks about teen sex trafficking. States have decriminalized it for teens and offered help, and some are attacking the demand for commercial sex.
  • 05.12.16

    Numbers elusive when it comes to trafficking

    Estimating the number of human trafficking victims in the United States is notoriously difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    India: Delivering water by hand

    In much of India, getting enough water is a low-tech affair. In some places, women draw water by hand; in others suicide rates among farmers have risen because drought and dropping water tables make their lives difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    Israel: Using technology, engineering to cut reliance on Galilee

    Water has been a matter of national security for Israel since the nation's inception. Drought and growth have pushed the country to use desalination, wastewater recycling and other technology and engineering feats to address the demand. But it's a different picture where Palestinians are involved.