American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. Research shows bilingual people can have learning advantages over monolingual people. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Read together as a family at home

File under: education, reading, literacy, breaking the cycle of poverty

4 (1 votes)

From: Mary H., Wilmington, DE

Encourage parents and guardians to read to their children as a family activity from birth through middle school. Children who are read to and talked to are better prepared for school and perform better in school.

Read to Them has created the One School One Book program to encourage families to read at home and encourage whole towns to become involved in reading aloud. This is an activity that can engage everyone in a family from infants to grandparents.

One of my most cherished memories is of a Christmas Day spent reading The Best Christmas Pageant with my husband, 9-year-old child, 80-year-old mother, and 78-year-old aunt. We all took turns reading a chapter, and laughed ourselves silly. Sadly, both of the older generation are gone now, but we all remember that day with great fondness.

Literacy is a key to financial success because good reading skills ensure educational success, which leads to better jobs and more permanent employment. Nowadays, even plumbers and electricians need a high degree of literacy. This idea will not lead to immediate poverty mitigation, but it will help break the cycle of poverty.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. Research shows bilingual people can have learning advantages over monolingual people. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on How Children Succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it’s character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

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    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

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    Is School Funding Fair?

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