American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Recent Posts

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    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.
  • 05.28.15

    Divestment on Campus

    Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Invest in youth -- especially rehabilitated juvenile offenders

File under: mentoring, civil rights

0 (0 votes)

From: David S., Pittsburg, CA

I am a juvenile offender, or, as the district attorney stated, "a menace to society." My offenses were at the ripe old age of 13, though I was not released from probation until age 20 (it's as if the system says, "No, you cannot succeed. You create our jobs, peasant!"). And I have had no offenses since, not even a ticket. Here in the Bay Area, the challenges that most youth face are in the home. Believe me: It is the home that dictates what goes down with the kids. Kids are central to this issue of poverty and reducing poverty simply because they will carry on our third world vision of rehabilitation in the criminal system and be our drug dealers and homeless people.

I'm 22 years of age, and I have something to say: We poor people, we non-high school grads, we dropouts, we impoverished underclass -- we are also of intelligent design. You can ask for more funding, but surely a war can not be won by funding alone. You can implement more strategy, but I say, "Surely a house can not stand if its foundation is weak," or was, in all actuality, ill founded. We will always have homeless people, thugs and criminals. But the youth, if truly sought after, will heed the call and come if the call comes in time. We are not the only players on the field. We are those that would enlighten, lead and uplift.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.
  • 05.28.15

    Divestment on Campus

    Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?