American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Invest in youth -- especially rehabilitated juvenile offenders

File under: mentoring, civil rights

0 (0 votes)

From: David S., Pittsburg, CA

I am a juvenile offender, or, as the district attorney stated, "a menace to society." My offenses were at the ripe old age of 13, though I was not released from probation until age 20 (it's as if the system says, "No, you cannot succeed. You create our jobs, peasant!"). And I have had no offenses since, not even a ticket. Here in the Bay Area, the challenges that most youth face are in the home. Believe me: It is the home that dictates what goes down with the kids. Kids are central to this issue of poverty and reducing poverty simply because they will carry on our third world vision of rehabilitation in the criminal system and be our drug dealers and homeless people.

I'm 22 years of age, and I have something to say: We poor people, we non-high school grads, we dropouts, we impoverished underclass -- we are also of intelligent design. You can ask for more funding, but surely a war can not be won by funding alone. You can implement more strategy, but I say, "Surely a house can not stand if its foundation is weak," or was, in all actuality, ill founded. We will always have homeless people, thugs and criminals. But the youth, if truly sought after, will heed the call and come if the call comes in time. We are not the only players on the field. We are those that would enlighten, lead and uplift.


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American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.16

    Victims, not criminals: Rebranding teen sex trafficking

    The nation is changing the way it thinks about teen sex trafficking. States have decriminalized it for teens and offered help, and some are attacking the demand for commercial sex.
  • 05.12.16

    Numbers elusive when it comes to trafficking

    Estimating the number of human trafficking victims in the United States is notoriously difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    India: Delivering water by hand

    In much of India, getting enough water is a low-tech affair. In some places, women draw water by hand; in others suicide rates among farmers have risen because drought and dropping water tables make their lives difficult.
  • 05.12.16

    Israel: Using technology, engineering to cut reliance on Galilee

    Water has been a matter of national security for Israel since the nation's inception. Drought and growth have pushed the country to use desalination, wastewater recycling and other technology and engineering feats to address the demand. But it's a different picture where Palestinians are involved.