American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Invest in youth -- especially rehabilitated juvenile offenders

File under: mentoring, civil rights

0 (0 votes)

From: David S., Pittsburg, CA

I am a juvenile offender, or, as the district attorney stated, "a menace to society." My offenses were at the ripe old age of 13, though I was not released from probation until age 20 (it's as if the system says, "No, you cannot succeed. You create our jobs, peasant!"). And I have had no offenses since, not even a ticket. Here in the Bay Area, the challenges that most youth face are in the home. Believe me: It is the home that dictates what goes down with the kids. Kids are central to this issue of poverty and reducing poverty simply because they will carry on our third world vision of rehabilitation in the criminal system and be our drug dealers and homeless people.

I'm 22 years of age, and I have something to say: We poor people, we non-high school grads, we dropouts, we impoverished underclass -- we are also of intelligent design. You can ask for more funding, but surely a war can not be won by funding alone. You can implement more strategy, but I say, "Surely a house can not stand if its foundation is weak," or was, in all actuality, ill founded. We will always have homeless people, thugs and criminals. But the youth, if truly sought after, will heed the call and come if the call comes in time. We are not the only players on the field. We are those that would enlighten, lead and uplift.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.