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Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

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    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Punish companies who hire illegal immigrants

File under: jobs, government

0 (0 votes)

From: Ron W., Cary, NC

Illegal immigration is driving down wages for low-skilled Americans due to the fact that the vast majority of illegal immigrants compete for jobs with poorly educated Americans. Many companies exploit illegal immigrants and likewise, low-skilled Americans, by pitting them against one another for jobs. If all companies in America were required to use the federal government's online E-Verify System, and we punished those companies who continue to hire illegal workers, most low-skilled Americans could earn at least a living wage.

I'm all for increasing the minimum wage, but if we don't pay attention to the increase of worker supply through immigration, we will still have high unemployment among the ranks of low-skilled citizens. And we now have those who wish to give amnesty to illegal immigrants while 15 million Americans are out of work. Americans will do just about any work, so there aren't jobs Americans don't want to do. There are jobs Americans don't want to do for $6.00 an hour because they can't live on those wages.


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American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.