American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Encourage education

File under: education

0 (0 votes)

From: Grace E. R., Portland, OR

I was born into poverty. My mother and father were born into poverty. Both did not make it through to high school. These two uneducated people did the best they could with what they had -- which was not much -- had us three kids, and eventually (because of alcoholism) split up, leaving us kids in foster home system from hell. This was in the 1950s. I often wonder what would have happened if my mother were educated beyond high school. She would have made better choices because she would have had a salary of her own, not been so dependent on her guy. I wonder what would have happened if my father would have been educated through high school and beyond. He would have been able to support his family. He would have had better self-esteem, and perhaps would have not turned to alcohol to mask his pain and shame. Both my parents were brilliant, but did not have a way to express themselves and serve their communities due to limitations in their educations.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.