American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide "one stop" coordinated and comprehensive social services

File under: welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Rebekah M., Eden Prairie, MN

Too many agencies in too many locations with too many forms and often conflicting program requirements and duplicated staff are competing for a finite number of public and private funds to provide incomplete help to a population typically overwhelmed by daily family and financial functioning. The solution? A "one stop shop" model that provide comprehensive support to families:

- A single point of entry

- One case manager (or at least one point person coordinating services)

- Collaboration among agencies and services in a shared location

- Full support across areas such as food, clothing, housing, transportation, employment, financial literacy, nutritional education, health care access and more

- Long-term relationship building to reduce reliance on social service assistance over time

Several community agencies, including Golden Valley, Minnesota's PRISM (People Responding In Social Ministry) are actively working to move to this model.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Minorities and Special Ed

For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Recent Posts

  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.
  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.