American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide school- and home-based tutors and mentors (and other education support)

File under: education, mentoring

0 (0 votes)

From: Nicole D., Grand Rapids, MI

To improve our children's chances at success, we need to increase and improve their educational opportunities. So many of our schools in poverty-stricken areas are failing. Children cannot receive the education that they need to provide for their families in the future, and to attend college and obtain a college degree.

We need to ensure that low-income children have supports in place to help with things that may get in the way of their education. A child who has not eaten isn't going to perform well in school; instead, his mind will be on that empty stomach. If his mom or dad is too busy trying to make ends meet to help with homework, who's going to explain that math problem that he just doesn't understand? That's where school-based tutors and home-based mentors come in. Tutors and mentors provide relationships that allow children to grow, as well as learn. They give a child some stability when everything around him or her is falling apart.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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  • 08.12.14

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  • 08.04.14

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  • 07.29.14

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