American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide school- and home-based tutors and mentors (and other education support)

File under: education, mentoring

0 (0 votes)

From: Nicole D., Grand Rapids, MI

To improve our children's chances at success, we need to increase and improve their educational opportunities. So many of our schools in poverty-stricken areas are failing. Children cannot receive the education that they need to provide for their families in the future, and to attend college and obtain a college degree.

We need to ensure that low-income children have supports in place to help with things that may get in the way of their education. A child who has not eaten isn't going to perform well in school; instead, his mind will be on that empty stomach. If his mom or dad is too busy trying to make ends meet to help with homework, who's going to explain that math problem that he just doesn't understand? That's where school-based tutors and home-based mentors come in. Tutors and mentors provide relationships that allow children to grow, as well as learn. They give a child some stability when everything around him or her is falling apart.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.