American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

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  • 05.06.15

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    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Eliminate the link between politics and money

File under: government, other

2 (1 votes)

From: Perry L., Devils Lake, ND

I have worked in the field of poverty reduction through the Community Action Network for more than 34 years, and in my observations, eliminating the link between money and politics is the only answer. To have an open, honest, truthful and productive discussion about what causes poverty, people who finance election campaigns need to be part of the discussion, but not have veto power over whether the discussion happens or not. If national and statewide elected officials have to raise huge sums of money to seek re-election, that reduces their ability to focus on the needs of the nation or state. This lack of time and the need for daily fundraising allows lobbyists to gain greater influence over the governmental decision making process at the expense of almost everyone else impacted by the actual decision being made.

Almost every issue of national significance that would positively impact those who live daily in poverty has been decided based on some political calculation that benefits those most involved in financing political campaigns. The recent Supreme Court decision Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission may have created a situation where those with the power (i.e., campaign resources) can have even more influence on the governmental decision making process.

Eliminating abject poverty is well within the grasp of this country. If the relationship between money and our political process is not changed, however, although there may be some things that can be done, ultimately we are dealing with various forms of income redistribution. And those with the highest incomes, the individuals that strategically finance political campaigns, will increasingly use our broken political process to insure that poverty remains a constant within our society. The Bible says the poor will always be with us. As a country, we continue to do everything possible to make sure that statement remains eternally true.


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American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.