American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

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    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Assist in re-education if jobs not available

File under: education, welfare, job training, civil rights

4 (1 votes)

From: David F., Lafayette, LA

I had hoped to supplement my government disability income, but the system is very quick to penalize you and to remove benefits or to make you pay for them. So working part time can cause you to have less money. Of course, blind people have lived with high unemployment rates, from 68 to 80 percent, for decades. If our unemployment were in line with the national average (nearly 10 percent), we'd actually be doing very well!

I thought education would help me get to a better place and leave an abusive work situation. I obtained a Master of Library and Information Science degree in 1998, and looked for work all over the country. I thought my good grades and participation in campus organizations relating to my degree might help. I sometimes wonder if I'll ever work anywhere, especially anywhere supportive that might really value me as a person and care if I show up or not.

I do think education is a key, but perhaps shorter kinds of education such as specialized training that builds on a degree but is not a degree itself. I am told now that my state's rehabilitation agency will not fund any further training for me, not even something online. I had hoped to be chosen to compete on a trivia-type game show and use the possible winnings for further my education. But this simply has not happened. All I can say is education has to count for something, and surely someone out there believes in chances and can think out-of-the-box in a notable way. I have not yet found this person, but I hope I do one day and am able to have a successful employment history.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.