American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Re-establish the middle class

File under: income, health care

4 (1 votes)

From: Gene W., Bismarck, ND

The working class must be saved in much the same way the financial sector was saved from collapse over a year ago. In fact, a more intelligent economic stimulus plan at that time would have been restoring the wealth of workers first, then that of the banks. One hundred percent of health care must be provided. Health care and retirement pensions are forms of wealth that have been systematically withdrawn from the middle class over the past 30 years. Wages must be restored. Current middle income wage earners cannot afford to maintain middle class standards of living. Although median range income earners continue to exist, the middle class, as a way of life, has ceased to exist in the United States. As a result, businesses and industries are experiencing economic hardship. But when businesses and industries spent two generations firing workers and trimming wages and benefits in order to inflate stock prices and look profitable in the short term, they were bound to run out of customers to sell their products to. More at www.viewfromthemiddle.org


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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  • 08.12.14

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