American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

End government assistance

File under: welfare

1 (1 votes)

From: Joy W., Copperopolis, CA

Even during the Great Depression, there were no free government handouts -- no welfare, food stamps, unemployment, or job training. When these programs were instituted to ease those in poverty, they were meant to be short-term assistance, not a lifestyle. Instead of helping people out of poverty, these programs locked them in. Why work and take responsibility for yourself and your family when the government will do it for you? What a selfish society the War on Poverty has created.

What about people who paid into Social Security for the required number of years, but because of disability prior to retirement age, are no longer eligible for retirement benefits because they could not work up to their retirement age? All the monies they paid into their Social Security accounts that could have benefited them now is gone. If these people had been allowed to put these same funds into their own private retirement account instead of a government program, they might not be living under poverty conditions today.

The only way to win the War on Poverty, is to make each individual responsible for their actions or non-actions. Teach them how to become self-sufficient. We have become a society of lazy, self-absorbed, irresponsible people, thinking it is the government's place to fill in where needed. Government's role is to protect our individual rights and our borders from invasion, nothing more.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

Recent Posts

  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.
  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.