American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
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    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Provide medical insurance

File under: health care

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From: Judyth B., Writewordsinc@yahoo. com, MN

After getting kicked off MinnesotaCare (along with about 100,000 other Minnesotans), I began using a free clinic but did not receive blood tests, which would have shown deteriorating kidneys. Had I known, it would have enabled me to begin a dietary regime that would have helped, although better diabetes control with medications would have helped more. Thus, I am now living with one-fourth of the normal kidney function, and will likely be on a waiting list for a transplant in the future. I am now old enough for Medicare and UCare (a nonprofit health plan in Minnesota and Wisconsin for seniors and people with low incomes or disabilities), and when I need a transplant, it will be much more costly than monitoring and meds would have been on MinnesotaCare.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.