American RadioWorks |
school-discipline

Spare the Rod

A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.

Recent Posts

  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.
  • 08.04.16

    What is restorative justice?

    Students of color are twice as likely to be suspended as white kids. So schools are turning to an alternative called restorative justice.
  • 07.28.16

    A homeless student struggles towards graduation

    We follow a homeless student as she fights to graduate from high school.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Make friends and share your story

File under: social networks

0 (0 votes)

From: Eileen B., Manchester, NH

Many people who are in difficult financial straits often are isolated, with no close friends. Friends can be emotional support, contacts for jobs, and sources of information. Sharing a story of being poor now or in the past reduces stigma, focuses on reality, and builds community, which strengthens bonds among people who can then help one another. Social capital is not expensive, requires no votes, and is proven to be successful.


Comments:

typog b.
From Rockland, MA

I am amazed to discover many low-income families do not understand the need to live on a budget or how to live on a fixed income. The meaning of 'budget' is foreign to some low-income families. Perhaps providing a supportive course on how to budget on a low household income, might be of benefit for some low-income persons.


American RadioWorks |
school-discipline

Spare the Rod

A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.

Recent Posts

  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.
  • 08.04.16

    What is restorative justice?

    Students of color are twice as likely to be suspended as white kids. So schools are turning to an alternative called restorative justice.
  • 07.28.16

    A homeless student struggles towards graduation

    We follow a homeless student as she fights to graduate from high school.