American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

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  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Support education through college

File under: education, mentoring

1 (1 votes)

From: Kirke C., Corvallis, OR

In my 20s, I was among many who tried to obtain a college degree but did not have sufficient family financial support. A work-study program at my school assured me a few hours of minimum pay, which turned out to be an anchor more than help. When a person must pay for an apartment, transportation, utilities, food, books and tuition, but has inadequate income for all that, then the student must choose between committing to loans or dropping school. I never completed requirements for a bachelor degree. I am now approaching 70, and have a wonderful background of mixed informal and formal education. But I didn't acquired it in time to apply it to a career.

A book by Dr. Donna Beegle titled, "See Poverty...Be the Difference," advocates mentoring. Dr. Beegle came from generational poverty, and she explains the poverty culture. Truly, you will gain more understanding through this book than anything I might offer.


Comments:

Chuck M.
From Chicago, IL

Unfortunately, the education establishment has come to be much like the security establishment, mainly concerned with their own perpetuation and offering little value to the public. If somehow we were able to increase the number of workers who have college education in certain fields, this would result in lower wages for the affected workers, and/or an unjustified increase in the credentials required.


American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.