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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Support education through college

File under: education, mentoring

1 (1 votes)

From: Kirke C., Corvallis, OR

In my 20s, I was among many who tried to obtain a college degree but did not have sufficient family financial support. A work-study program at my school assured me a few hours of minimum pay, which turned out to be an anchor more than help. When a person must pay for an apartment, transportation, utilities, food, books and tuition, but has inadequate income for all that, then the student must choose between committing to loans or dropping school. I never completed requirements for a bachelor degree. I am now approaching 70, and have a wonderful background of mixed informal and formal education. But I didn't acquired it in time to apply it to a career.

A book by Dr. Donna Beegle titled, "See Poverty...Be the Difference," advocates mentoring. Dr. Beegle came from generational poverty, and she explains the poverty culture. Truly, you will gain more understanding through this book than anything I might offer.


Comments:

Chuck M.
From Chicago, IL

Unfortunately, the education establishment has come to be much like the security establishment, mainly concerned with their own perpetuation and offering little value to the public. If somehow we were able to increase the number of workers who have college education in certain fields, this would result in lower wages for the affected workers, and/or an unjustified increase in the credentials required.


American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.
  • 01.15.16

    Learning as a Science

    What does research say about how students learn best? A group of deans from schools of education around the country has united to make sure future teachers are armed with information about what works in the classroom.