American RadioWorks |
Candidates for teaching jobs in Washington, D.C. complete a writing sample as part of their interview. Photo: Emily Hanford, from ARW's "Testing Teachers" documentary

Green Teachers

A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.

Recent Posts

  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.
  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Support education through college

File under: education, mentoring

1 (1 votes)

From: Kirke C., Corvallis, OR

In my 20s, I was among many who tried to obtain a college degree but did not have sufficient family financial support. A work-study program at my school assured me a few hours of minimum pay, which turned out to be an anchor more than help. When a person must pay for an apartment, transportation, utilities, food, books and tuition, but has inadequate income for all that, then the student must choose between committing to loans or dropping school. I never completed requirements for a bachelor degree. I am now approaching 70, and have a wonderful background of mixed informal and formal education. But I didn't acquired it in time to apply it to a career.

A book by Dr. Donna Beegle titled, "See Poverty...Be the Difference," advocates mentoring. Dr. Beegle came from generational poverty, and she explains the poverty culture. Truly, you will gain more understanding through this book than anything I might offer.


Comments:

Chuck M.
From Chicago, IL

Unfortunately, the education establishment has come to be much like the security establishment, mainly concerned with their own perpetuation and offering little value to the public. If somehow we were able to increase the number of workers who have college education in certain fields, this would result in lower wages for the affected workers, and/or an unjustified increase in the credentials required.


American RadioWorks |
Candidates for teaching jobs in Washington, D.C. complete a writing sample as part of their interview. Photo: Emily Hanford, from ARW's "Testing Teachers" documentary

Green Teachers

A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.

Recent Posts

  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.
  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.