American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay people for any and all net benefits they produce

File under: other, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Larry M., Chapel Hill, NC

The kind of money we have now, physical object money, or POM for short, is replaced by computerized accounts. The winner-take-all model of market competition is replaced by an ingenious principle -- you get paid for anything that produces a net benefit. Money is added to your account when the benefit has occurred. So if you help your neighbor move her sofa, you get paid when it's upstairs. If you help build a bridge across a river, your pay begins when the bridge opens, and you get periodic payments as long as it's in use. Of course building a bridge can take years. How do you live until it's done? Necessities like plain-but-wholesome food, a decent place to live, basic clothing, and medical care are all free.

The complete solution is fully described at http://www.nopom.info. We can completely eliminate poverty within two years of the solution being put in place. As side benefits, the solution also eliminates unemployment, inflation/deflation, debt, taxes, organized crime, and the boom/bust business cycle. Further advantages include substantial reductions in discrimination, pollution, and crime.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.