American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

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  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay people for any and all net benefits they produce

File under: other, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Larry M., Chapel Hill, NC

The kind of money we have now, physical object money, or POM for short, is replaced by computerized accounts. The winner-take-all model of market competition is replaced by an ingenious principle -- you get paid for anything that produces a net benefit. Money is added to your account when the benefit has occurred. So if you help your neighbor move her sofa, you get paid when it's upstairs. If you help build a bridge across a river, your pay begins when the bridge opens, and you get periodic payments as long as it's in use. Of course building a bridge can take years. How do you live until it's done? Necessities like plain-but-wholesome food, a decent place to live, basic clothing, and medical care are all free.

The complete solution is fully described at http://www.nopom.info. We can completely eliminate poverty within two years of the solution being put in place. As side benefits, the solution also eliminates unemployment, inflation/deflation, debt, taxes, organized crime, and the boom/bust business cycle. Further advantages include substantial reductions in discrimination, pollution, and crime.


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American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.