American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay people for any and all net benefits they produce

File under: other, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Larry M., Chapel Hill, NC

The kind of money we have now, physical object money, or POM for short, is replaced by computerized accounts. The winner-take-all model of market competition is replaced by an ingenious principle -- you get paid for anything that produces a net benefit. Money is added to your account when the benefit has occurred. So if you help your neighbor move her sofa, you get paid when it's upstairs. If you help build a bridge across a river, your pay begins when the bridge opens, and you get periodic payments as long as it's in use. Of course building a bridge can take years. How do you live until it's done? Necessities like plain-but-wholesome food, a decent place to live, basic clothing, and medical care are all free.

The complete solution is fully described at http://www.nopom.info. We can completely eliminate poverty within two years of the solution being put in place. As side benefits, the solution also eliminates unemployment, inflation/deflation, debt, taxes, organized crime, and the boom/bust business cycle. Further advantages include substantial reductions in discrimination, pollution, and crime.


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American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.