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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay people for any and all net benefits they produce

File under: other, income

0 (0 votes)

From: Larry M., Chapel Hill, NC

The kind of money we have now, physical object money, or POM for short, is replaced by computerized accounts. The winner-take-all model of market competition is replaced by an ingenious principle -- you get paid for anything that produces a net benefit. Money is added to your account when the benefit has occurred. So if you help your neighbor move her sofa, you get paid when it's upstairs. If you help build a bridge across a river, your pay begins when the bridge opens, and you get periodic payments as long as it's in use. Of course building a bridge can take years. How do you live until it's done? Necessities like plain-but-wholesome food, a decent place to live, basic clothing, and medical care are all free.

The complete solution is fully described at http://www.nopom.info. We can completely eliminate poverty within two years of the solution being put in place. As side benefits, the solution also eliminates unemployment, inflation/deflation, debt, taxes, organized crime, and the boom/bust business cycle. Further advantages include substantial reductions in discrimination, pollution, and crime.


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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.
  • 01.15.16

    Learning as a Science

    What does research say about how students learn best? A group of deans from schools of education around the country has united to make sure future teachers are armed with information about what works in the classroom.