American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Invest in early childhood education

File under: child care, education

0 (0 votes)

From: Elizabeth P., Chapel Hill, NC

I'm a researcher at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, working on ways to close the achievement gap between children raised in poverty and other children. The results of one of the studies I work on, the Abecedarian Project, provides strong evidence that early childhood education in a high quality child care setting can have long lasting effects (we now have data through age 30) on the educational outcomes of these children, including more likely to go to college. Higher education is associated with higher economic outcomes -- thus a way to fight poverty!

Further, both neurological research and economic research demonstrate that the earlier in life we begin, the easier it is and the less expensive it is to achieve these results. The cost-benefits analysis of our study found that for every $1 spent, society got back $2.50 (from higher taxes paid on higher incomes because of better educational outcomes). Another long-term study of early educational intervention for children raised in poverty, the Perry Preschool Project, found for every $1 spent, over $12 was saved in reduced crime rates. So, my vote for tackling this problem: working with families and young children from birth. The science backs up this approach very clearly.


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American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.