American RadioWorks |
Michael Walker with students in Minneapolis (photo: @MPS_BlackMales Twitter account)

Boosting Black Male Student Achievement

The Minneapolis Public School District created an Office of Black Male Student Achievement earlier this year. One goal of the office is to help young African American men graduate from high school in greater numbers.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Develop welfare programs that foster interdependent generations

File under: welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Ajay B., Minneapolis, MN

"Take good care of your children...they will choose your old age home," reads a bumper sticker. We are interdependent on our family and society. At the level of a family, parents take care of the children, each other and grandparents. At the level of a society, the working population pays for the welfare of the preceding and succeeding generations. A child can be conditioned to be altruistic towards a parent and the public. The government has a prominent role in this conditioning.

Government assistance can add to whatever parents are able to provide, allowing children to reach their full potential. This makes children productive citizens, and gives them a feeling of gratitude towards their parents. Government assistance can also replace parental provision, which may weaken the sense of obligation and gratitude towards parents. Thus, the government has to do a balancing act with regard to its various welfare programs. For example, recent research has shown that welfare programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) might have unintended consequences which go beyond nutrition.

Designers and administrators of welfare programs in state and federal governments need to provide a more coordinated package of programs. Then, and only then, will the programs achieve their goal of increased welfare. Providing better management and resources to the welfare programs might seem like an additional burden on government resources, but integrated management of programs will likely yield personnel and office space cost savings. Also, different generations taking better care of each other might save the state on expenditures on seniors and foster care.


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American RadioWorks |
Michael Walker with students in Minneapolis (photo: @MPS_BlackMales Twitter account)

Boosting Black Male Student Achievement

The Minneapolis Public School District created an Office of Black Male Student Achievement earlier this year. One goal of the office is to help young African American men graduate from high school in greater numbers.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.