American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Teach them what you know

File under: job training, jobs

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From: Julie M., Apex, NC

In my company I have a policy of hiring people that are "unemployable." My workers are Montagnard refugee women from the mountains of Vietnam. These women lived off the land in the jungles all of their lives. What we call poverty, they call wealth. The Montagnards don't feel downtrodden or poor. They are full of ambition and enthusiasm, and they love to work and learn. Poverty can't be cured by some governmental "war;" it's cured one person at a time, learning from one person at a time. Each of my workers comes to me completely unskilled in American life. I design products that are within the skill level of each woman, and keep them working while they're learning new things -- first from me, then from each other, then from volunteers that come to the studio and interns from North Carolina State University. While the interns are teaching the refugee women, they are also learning how to fight poverty.


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American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

Recent Posts

  • 06.28.16

    New Podcast Name!

    We have a new name for our podcast! We'll still dive into new ideas and research on how we learn and how we teach.
  • 06.23.16

    Merging Small, Rural School Districts

    Small, rural schools around the country are closing. Our guest says that could actually be a good thing.
  • 06.17.16

    Fighting for ‘Our School’

    What's the role of a school in a rural town? We begin our series on rural schools by looking at a state where the fight has been particularly fierce: Vermont.
  • 05.26.16

    The ‘Invisible Tax’ on Teachers of Color

    Our guest says the so-called 'invisible tax' on teachers of color leads to burnout at a time when teachers of color are already leaving the profession more quickly than their white colleagues.