American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Teach them what you know

File under: job training, jobs

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From: Julie M., Apex, NC

In my company I have a policy of hiring people that are "unemployable." My workers are Montagnard refugee women from the mountains of Vietnam. These women lived off the land in the jungles all of their lives. What we call poverty, they call wealth. The Montagnards don't feel downtrodden or poor. They are full of ambition and enthusiasm, and they love to work and learn. Poverty can't be cured by some governmental "war;" it's cured one person at a time, learning from one person at a time. Each of my workers comes to me completely unskilled in American life. I design products that are within the skill level of each woman, and keep them working while they're learning new things -- first from me, then from each other, then from volunteers that come to the studio and interns from North Carolina State University. While the interns are teaching the refugee women, they are also learning how to fight poverty.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.