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How to help students hope

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Tackle poverty holistically -- then give people freedom to succeed

File under: welfare, education, health care, job training, civil rights, social networks

2 (1 votes)

From: Michael D., Portland, OR

We often think of poverty as lack of money. But poverty happens on five levels: emotionally, physically, mentally, socially, and spiritually. When people have a need in one or more of these areas, then they experience poverty. Often, when people lack too much in a particular area, then they are affected in their ability to work and become financially stable. Government programs can fall short because they focus on the surface issues rather than looking at the overall health of a person. Each area must be strengthened for a person to be whole. Once people are stronger in each area, then they are in a place to be find stability in work.

There are many who are complete in all five areas, yet lack financial stability due to government obstacles. High taxes, rules that penalize people who achieve a certain level of income, and unnecessary regulations can put people in a position to not achieve their potential. The war on poverty can be won if we help people find healing and wholeness in the five areas, and if the government removes unnecessary obstacles to free people up to reach their potential.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photo: Daniel Buchanan

How to help students hope

A polling expert finds students less engaged with school as they get older. Brandon Busteed from Gallup Education says if schools taught to strengths instead of weaknesses, more students would be successful in school and in life.

Recent Posts

  • 10.21.14

    Making it stick

    Why do we remember some things, and forget others? That's what author Peter Brown and psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel set out to answer in their new book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.
  • 10.14.14

    What teachers need

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with author Elizabeth Green about her new book, Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone).
  • 10.07.14

    Intelligence is achievable and other lessons from The Teacher Wars

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford continues her conversation with Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars.
  • 10.01.14

    Teaching: The most embattled profession

    Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with bestselling author Dana Goldstein about her new book, The Teacher Wars.