American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Raise or eliminate public housing age limits

File under: housing

5 (2 votes)

From: Monica W., Bloomington, MN

When a young man living in public housing with his family turns 18, he must leave his family and strike out on his own. So often, it just means homelessness for that young man. He may be a senior in high school and have to drop out to find a job to pay for some housing. How can an 18-year-old think about going to collage if his home with his family is taken away from him? Once he turns 18, there is no economic help; there is no support or safety net. His family is struggling as it is.

The right thing to do would be to allow an 18-year-old to continue to live in public housing with his family, finish high school, and start a job or continue to college. The next step would be transitional housing so he can learn the skills necessary to be on his own before he has to go out on his own. This makes sense for the 18-year-old, his family, and society who will pick up the bill if this 18-year-old gets into trouble being unemployed, unschooled, incapable of fitting into society.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Photos: Stephen Smith

Thirsty Planet

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel. A vast and ecologically diverse country, India suffers from water problems found across the globe: flooding, drought, pollution, and lack of access by the poor. In Israel, a combination of cutting-edge technology and sweeping government policy has largely solved the nation's long struggle with water scarcity. But the benefits of abundant water are not shared equally throughout Israel and the West Bank.

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  • 05.12.16

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  • 05.12.16

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    In much of India, getting enough water is a low-tech affair. In some places, women draw water by hand; in others suicide rates among farmers have risen because drought and dropping water tables make their lives difficult.
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