American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Raise or eliminate public housing age limits

File under: housing

5 (2 votes)

From: Monica W., Bloomington, MN

When a young man living in public housing with his family turns 18, he must leave his family and strike out on his own. So often, it just means homelessness for that young man. He may be a senior in high school and have to drop out to find a job to pay for some housing. How can an 18-year-old think about going to collage if his home with his family is taken away from him? Once he turns 18, there is no economic help; there is no support or safety net. His family is struggling as it is.

The right thing to do would be to allow an 18-year-old to continue to live in public housing with his family, finish high school, and start a job or continue to college. The next step would be transitional housing so he can learn the skills necessary to be on his own before he has to go out on his own. This makes sense for the 18-year-old, his family, and society who will pick up the bill if this 18-year-old gets into trouble being unemployed, unschooled, incapable of fitting into society.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.