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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Raise or eliminate public housing age limits

File under: housing

5 (2 votes)

From: Monica W., Bloomington, MN

When a young man living in public housing with his family turns 18, he must leave his family and strike out on his own. So often, it just means homelessness for that young man. He may be a senior in high school and have to drop out to find a job to pay for some housing. How can an 18-year-old think about going to collage if his home with his family is taken away from him? Once he turns 18, there is no economic help; there is no support or safety net. His family is struggling as it is.

The right thing to do would be to allow an 18-year-old to continue to live in public housing with his family, finish high school, and start a job or continue to college. The next step would be transitional housing so he can learn the skills necessary to be on his own before he has to go out on his own. This makes sense for the 18-year-old, his family, and society who will pick up the bill if this 18-year-old gets into trouble being unemployed, unschooled, incapable of fitting into society.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.04.16

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    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

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