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science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Create sustainable support systems within communities

File under: social networks

2 (1 votes)

From: Karen G., Livonia, MI

The United States is one of the wealthiest nations in the world. We have lost our roots about how our nation got that way. In the beginning, communities pulled together as a unit because they had to in order to survive. As we became fat and happy as a nation, we proclaimed independence from the social and sustainable networks that kept people safe and sound regardless of social status or income. The illiterate, elderly and disabled were categorized as problems because they took time and attention away from making money and satisfying one's own ego ideal about the American dream. Now, the United States has gone full circle, where the same people who had money find themselves in poverty.

People in other places, such as Africa, who also live in poverty, embrace and support those people we Americans despise. That support creates a safety net for a sustainable community. Money does not buy love. Money helps provide services, which in a sustainable community may be a natural byproduct such as food, shelter and emotional support.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

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  • 08.12.14

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