American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Create sustainable support systems within communities

File under: social networks

2 (1 votes)

From: Karen G., Livonia, MI

The United States is one of the wealthiest nations in the world. We have lost our roots about how our nation got that way. In the beginning, communities pulled together as a unit because they had to in order to survive. As we became fat and happy as a nation, we proclaimed independence from the social and sustainable networks that kept people safe and sound regardless of social status or income. The illiterate, elderly and disabled were categorized as problems because they took time and attention away from making money and satisfying one's own ego ideal about the American dream. Now, the United States has gone full circle, where the same people who had money find themselves in poverty.

People in other places, such as Africa, who also live in poverty, embrace and support those people we Americans despise. That support creates a safety net for a sustainable community. Money does not buy love. Money helps provide services, which in a sustainable community may be a natural byproduct such as food, shelter and emotional support.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
20160414_1_0024

Rewriting the Sentence

Every year 700,000 inmates leave prison. Strong evidence shows that those who have a college degree are less likely to come back. So after an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons try to maintain college education for prisoners.

Recent Posts

  • 09.01.16

    What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools

    The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.
  • 08.26.16

    Spare the Rod

    A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.
  • 08.18.16

    Stuck at Square One

    A system meant to give college students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.
  • 08.11.16

    Hungry hungry students

    When was the last time you ate? In one survey, 7 percent of college students said they went an entire day without eating.