American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Create sustainable support systems within communities

File under: social networks

2 (1 votes)

From: Karen G., Livonia, MI

The United States is one of the wealthiest nations in the world. We have lost our roots about how our nation got that way. In the beginning, communities pulled together as a unit because they had to in order to survive. As we became fat and happy as a nation, we proclaimed independence from the social and sustainable networks that kept people safe and sound regardless of social status or income. The illiterate, elderly and disabled were categorized as problems because they took time and attention away from making money and satisfying one's own ego ideal about the American dream. Now, the United States has gone full circle, where the same people who had money find themselves in poverty.

People in other places, such as Africa, who also live in poverty, embrace and support those people we Americans despise. That support creates a safety net for a sustainable community. Money does not buy love. Money helps provide services, which in a sustainable community may be a natural byproduct such as food, shelter and emotional support.


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American RadioWorks |
Kids playing video games. Photo: sean dreilinger via Flickr.

Learning from Video Games

A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Recent Posts

  • 06.17.15

    Teaching the Birds and the Bees

    For more than a century, Americans have been arguing about how to teach children about the birds and the bees in public schools. A new book argues that for all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it.
  • 06.11.15

    What can Japan teach us about teaching?

    Coming up this fall we'll be releasing a documentary about teacher preparation - how people learn to become teachers and how they get better once they're in the classroom. This week: how do Japanese teachers learn to improve on the job?
  • 06.02.15

    Million-Dollar Teacher

    When Nancie Atwell was growing up, she never thought she’d go to college, let alone become an award-winning teacher. But a few months ago, Atwell received a $1-million-dollar global prize for her decades of teaching English and literacy skills to elementary and middle schoolers.
  • 05.28.15

    Divestment on Campus

    Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?