(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Home | Oral History Archive | Reporter's Notebook
ORAL HISTORY ARCHIVE

All of the veterans we interviewed had amazing stories --about comraderie, warfare, pain, and sacrifice . We've arranged some of their most thought-provoking stories into a series of Editors' Picks--each on a different subject like combat, POW experiences, integration, conditions in Korea and homecoming. These will rotate each week, so stop back for future picks.

This week the focus is on
Homecoming Stories.


The Korean War was a staggeringly bloody war, killing almost 37,000 Americans and two million or more Koreans and Chinese. Hear Korean War veterans describe fighting hill by hill against a determined enemy.


Korean veterans often compare their homecoming to what World War II veterans received less than a decade before. Reamer Bell of Cincinnati, Ohio describes the contrast.
Listen (:35) or Read

Oscar Cortez of San Antonio, Texas was taken prisoner by the Koreans in February of 1951. He finally got the homecoming he was looking for many years later.
Listen (1:12) or Read

Shorty Estabrook oof Marianna, California was in a POW camp with his buddies when a long line of trucks went through and he learned the war was over and he would finally go home. But that wasn't the end of his troubles.
Listen (3:04) or Read

During the "Red Scare" --the anti-communist fervor that gripped America during the 1950's-- veterans who had been captured by communists during the Korean War were under suspicion of being collaborators. Shorty Estabrook remembers being interrogated by the FBI upon his return home.
Listen (2:03) or Read

Jack Goodwin of Waco, Texas describes the long recovery from the psychological trauma of being a prisoner of war.
Listen (1:07) or Read

When the Korean War started, it was considered a police action, not a war. For many years, it was only referred to as a conflict, not a war. Veteran John Jackson of Houston, Texas...
Listen (1:35) or Read

Previous week's topics:
Combat Stories
Race

SEARCH ALL INTERVIEWS
You can also search the archive yourself. Fill in one field --or more than one to narrow your search.

Name:
Branch:
Company:
Regiment:
Division:
Keyword:
Word search:
image credits: left and center - National Archives and Records Administration; right - Department of Defense
American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.