American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Back to all reports

George Washington University - $40,213.18 spent on 10 trips
39.6% spent on Democratic Party
0.0% spent on Independent Party
60.4% spent on Republican Party

FALEOMAVAEGA, ENI - Democratic Party
December 2, 2003 - December 4, 2003 (3 days)
South Korea
Purpose - to promote exchanges between the U.S. and Japan on trade and economic issues
Total Cost - $448.02

HONDA, MIKE - Democratic Party
December 2, 2003 - December 7, 2003 (6 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - Legislative exchange and meeting with Japanese Diet Members to discuss issues of concern to both nations
Total Cost - $1,394.42

HONDA, MIKE - Democratic Party
December 3, 2003 - December 7, 2003 (5 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - U.S. Japan Economic Agenda, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University, under a grant from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission
Total Cost -

MCDERMOTT, JAMES A - Democratic Party
January 7, 2002 - January 11, 2002 (5 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - 26th US-Japan Legislative Exchange Program
Total Cost - $5,685.31

MCDERMOTT, JAMES A - Democratic Party
December 2, 2003 - December 6, 2003 (5 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - Legislative exchange with Japanese Diet Members to discuss mutual national issues
Total Cost - $857.56

SENSENBRENNER, F JAMES JR - Republican Party
November 25, 2000 - December 2, 2000 (8 days)
Hong Kong - Tokyo, Japan
Co-sponsor(s):
Purpose - U.S.-Japan Legislative Exchange
Total Cost - $7,875.39

SENSENBRENNER, F JAMES JR - Republican Party
January 4, 2002 - January 11, 2002 (8 days)
Singapore - Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - legislative exchange program
Total Cost - $7,619.37

SENSENBRENNER, F JAMES JR - Republican Party
November 30, 2003 - December 5, 2003 (6 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - U.S. Japan Legislative Exchange Program
Total Cost - $8,790.54

WEINER, ANTHONY D - Democratic Party
January 7, 2002 - January 11, 2002 (5 days)
Tokyo, Japan
Purpose - attend 26th legislative exchange program meetings, discussions with Japanese legislators
Total Cost - $7,542.57

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.