American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to all reports

Globe USA - $8,692.95 spent on 6 trips
0.0% spent on Democratic Party
3.7% spent on Independent Party
96.3% spent on Republican Party

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
November 17, 2000 - November 20, 2000 (4 days)
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Purpose - To attend GLOBE International Executive Committee meeting in the Hague
Total Cost - $2,833.00

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
February 5, 2001 - February 6, 2001 (2 days)
Nairobi, Kenya - Kiunga, Kenya - Lamu, Kenya - Shimoni, Kenya
Purpose - Visit local government conservation programs
Total Cost - $3,220.28

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
November 30, 2001 - December 3, 2001 (4 days)
Paris, France
Purpose - Speak about alternative energy and pollution issues on the opening panel of the Global Conference on Oceans and Coasts.
Total Cost - $771.47

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
June 22, 2001 - June 23, 2001 (2 days)
Tarrytown, NY
Purpose - Participate in conference of how Export Credit Agencies impact the global climate system and the role they play in financing energy and fossil fuel infrastructure in developing countries with other legislators.
Total Cost - $310.00

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
July 13, 2001 - July 15, 2001 (3 days)
Queenstown, MD
Purpose - The International Legislators' Conference on Clean Energy and the 16th GLOBE International General Assembly.
Total Cost - $1,233.20

JEFFORDS, JAMES M - Independent Party
July 13, 2001 - July 14, 2001 (2 days)
Queenstown, MD
Purpose - Conference on clean technologies and alternative energy as ways of reducing gas emissions and addressing global climate change
Total Cost - $325.00

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.