American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

Back to all reports

Turner Broadcasting - $17,754.24 spent on 13 trips
87.0% spent on Democratic Party
0.0% spent on Independent Party
13.0% spent on Republican Party

BOUCHER, FREDRICK C - Democratic Party
June 24, 2001 - June 25, 2001 (2 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - Conference with executive officers and legal staff of AOL- TW regarding legislation relating its on-line music distribution services
Total Cost - $910.00

FORD, HAROLD E JR - Democratic Party
January 7, 2002 - January 8, 2002 (2 days)
Atlanta, GA
Purpose - speaking -- award recipient
Total Cost - $633.99

JOHNSON, EDDIE BERNICE - Democratic Party
January 8, 2001 - January 9, 2001 (2 days)
Atlanta, GA
Purpose - Trumpet Awards and Dinner
Total Cost - $472.22

ORTIZ, SOLOMON P - Democratic Party
October 23, 2003 - October 26, 2003 (4 days)
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Co-sponsor(s): Sony Music, Altria, Pfizer, Inc., Coca Cola Enterprises Inc, Fannie Mae, AstraZeneca, Aventis, Eli Lilly Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, Puerto Rico Telephone
Purpose - "Tri-Caucus Retreat" to improve relationships between member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus; the Cong. Black Caucus and the Cong/ Asian Pacific American Caucus
Total Cost - $5,736.66

WATERS, MAXINE - Democratic Party
January 5, 2002 - January 8, 2002 (4 days)
Atlanta, GA
Purpose - recipient of the "tower of power" award at the 10th annual trumpet awards, Turner Broadcasting, guest of honor at other related events over a three-day period
Total Cost - $4,371.10

BIDEN, JOSEPH R JR - Democratic Party
March 24, 2004 - March 24, 2004 (1 days)
Washington, DC
Purpose - Travel from Washington to Wilmington following an appearance on "Larry King Live"
Total Cost - $638.06

LIEBERMAN, JOSEPH I - Democratic Party
March 18, 2001 - March 18, 2001 (1 days)
Washington, DC
Purpose - Senator was guest on Late Edition
Total Cost - $103.56

LIEBERMAN, JOSEPH I - Democratic Party
May 13, 2001 - May 13, 2001 (1 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - Senator was guest on Late Edition
Total Cost - $27.50

LIEBERMAN, JOSEPH I - Democratic Party
July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2001 (1 days)
Washington, DC
Purpose - Senator was guest on Late Edition
Total Cost - $103.56

EMANUEL, RAHM - Democratic Party
August 13, 2004 - August 14, 2004 (2 days)
Los Angeles, CA
Purpose - Appearance on "Real Time with Bill Maher"
Total Cost - $2,194.89

BIDEN, JOSEPH R JR - Democratic Party
December 6, 2004 - December 6, 2004 (1 days)
Washington, DC
Purpose - Appearance on CNN Program "NewsNight with Aaron Brown"
Total Cost - $250.00

ROS-LEHTINEN, ILEANA - Republican Party
March 18, 2005 - March 18, 2005 (1 days)
Los Angeles, CA
Purpose - Live taping of HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher
Total Cost - $1,896.00

HAYWORTH, JD - Republican Party
April 19, 2004 - April 19, 2004 (1 days)
Las Vegas, NV
Purpose - Appearance on CNN's Crossfire
Total Cost - $416.70

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?