American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to all reports

NASDAQ - $149,019.33 spent on 37 trips
48.0% spent on Democratic Party
3.3% spent on Independent Party
48.7% spent on Republican Party

BIGGERT, JUDY - Republican Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - a summit to augment the relationships and concerns between business leaders and government officials
Total Cost - $4,270.78

CARSON, JULIA - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - leadership summit
Total Cost - $1,807.10

CRANE, PHILIP M - Republican Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - To participate in the NASDAQ Leadership Summit, where we discussed the federal budget deficit, outsourcing, expensing of stock options and legal reform.
Total Cost - $4,484.40

DAVIS, ARTUR GENESTRE - Democratic Party
March 14, 2003 - March 14, 2003 (1 days)
Birmingham, AL
Purpose - Ringing of morning bell at NASDAQ
Total Cost - $681.73

DELAY, THOMAS DALE - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 29, 2003 (2 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ leadership summit
Total Cost - $2,218.50

DICKS, NORM D - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Leadership summit for dialogue between business leaders and government officials to discuss ways to stimulate its economy
Total Cost - $6,657.05

DICKS, NORM D - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 4, 2004 (3 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ Leadership Summit - dialogue between business leaders and government officials
Total Cost - $4,358.90

DREIER, DAVID - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 29, 2003 (2 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Speech
Total Cost - $3,051.50

FERGUSON, MIKE - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - Educational/participant in panel at conference (NASDAQ Leadership Summit)
Total Cost - $3,653.05

FOSSELLA, VITO MR - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Fact finding
Total Cost - $3,037.00

GREENWOOD, JAMES C - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 30, 2003 (3 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ leadership summit
Total Cost - $6,943.00

ISAKSON, JOHN HARDY - Republican Party
July 21, 2001 - July 21, 2001 (1 days)
Nashville, TN
Purpose - Speaking engagement
Total Cost - $787.00

KANJORSKI, PAUL E - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL - Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - Participating in NASDAQ Leadership Summit - sat on panel with other government officials and business leaders re: ways to stimulate US economy
Total Cost - $8,049.84

LUCAS, KENNETH RAY - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 7, 2004 (6 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - legislative study and fact finding
Total Cost - $4,403.90

MCCARTHY, CAROLYN - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ leadership summit
Total Cost - $3,157.55

MCINNIS, SCOTT - Republican Party
March 27, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (5 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Leadership Summit
Total Cost - $4,696.90

MCINNIS, SCOTT - Republican Party
April 2, 2004 - April 4, 2004 (3 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - leadership summit--served on panel
Total Cost - $5,612.80

MEEKS, GREGORY W - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Dialogue between business leaders & gov't officials
Total Cost - $6,649.05

MILLER, BRAD - Democratic Party
March 14, 2003 - March 14, 2003 (1 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - To study the workings of the NASDAQ Market; tour of NASDAQ Marketsite
Total Cost - $646.99

MOORE, DENNIS - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 4, 2004 (3 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - dialogue with NASDAQ listed businesses
Total Cost - $5,719.80

MOORE, DENNIS - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Fort Lauderdale, FL
Purpose - Attend and participate in the NASDAQ Leadership Summit
Total Cost - $7,182.05

RILEY, BOB - Republican Party
May 20, 2001 - May 21, 2001 (2 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - educational visit to NASDAQ Stock Market, participation in opening of NASDAQ Stock Market
Total Cost - $1,393.62

ROSS, MICHAEL A - Democratic Party
March 13, 2003 - March 13, 2003 (1 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - learn about securities market issues
Total Cost - $937.49

ROYCE, ED - Republican Party
March 29, 2004 - March 29, 2004 (1 days)
New York, NY
Purpose - to learn about market structure issues
Total Cost - $287.14

RYUN, JIM R - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL - Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - leadership summit
Total Cost - $6,657.05

SANDLIN, MAX - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - dialogue between business leaders and government officials regarding stimulating economy
Total Cost - $4,100.05

TOOMEY, PATRICK - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - dialogue on U.S. economy between business leaders and government officials
Total Cost - $5,932.05

WELLER, GERALD C JERRY - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - speak at NASDAQ leadership summit
Total Cost - $4,334.40

BENNETT, ROBERT F - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 30, 2003 (3 days)
Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ leadership summit
Total Cost - $4,179.00

BREAUX, JOHN B - Democratic Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Key Biscayne, FL
Purpose - to participate in a Congressional Retreat concerning "Stimulating the U.S. Economy to Compete in the Global Arena"
Total Cost - $6,299.50

BREAUX, JOHN B - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - to speak to CEOs of Nasdaq and other Members of Congress on today's key policy issues
Total Cost - $274.70

BURNS, CONRAD R - Republican Party
April 3, 2004 - April 3, 2004 (1 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Participate in panel
Total Cost - $1,278.70

ALLEN, GEORGE - Republican Party
March 28, 2003 - March 31, 2003 (4 days)
Naples, FL
Purpose - Speaking engagement at NASDAQ leadership summit, a dialogue between leaders and government officials. Trip in 2003, signed & filed in 2003
Total Cost - $5,327.34

ALLARD, A WAYNE - Republican Party
April 2, 2004 - April 4, 2004 (3 days)
FL
Purpose - Educational discussions on economic issues and financial reforms
Total Cost - $4,484.40

SANDERS, BERNARD - Independent Party
April 3, 2004 - April 8, 2004 (6 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ Leadership Summit - Dialogue / meeting between business leaders from the NASDAQ listed community and government officials
Total Cost - $4,931.60

GUTIERREZ, LUIS V - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 4, 2004 (3 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - NASDAQ Leadership Summit - participant
Total Cost - $6,049.00

KANJORSKI, PAUL E - Democratic Party
April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Miami, FL
Purpose - Participate in 2004 NASDAQ Leadership Summit - dialogue between business leaders from the NASDAQ listed community and government officials to discuss economic issues US faces today
Total Cost - $4,484.40

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.