American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

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    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.

Back to all reports

Fannie Mae - $11,805.66 spent on 5 trips
80.7% spent on Democratic Party
0.0% spent on Independent Party
19.3% spent on Republican Party

BAKER, RICHARD HUGH - Republican Party
February 24, 2000 - February 24, 2000 (1 days)
New York, NY
Co-sponsor(s): Merrill Lynch
Purpose - Fact finding
Total Cost - $330.00

BAKER, RICHARD HUGH - Republican Party
February 18, 2000 - February 21, 2000 (4 days)
Salt Lake City, UT
Purpose - Financial Services -- Technology Conference
Total Cost - $1,950.00

LEE, BARBARA - Democratic Party
August 5, 2000 - August 17, 2000 (13 days)
Ghana
Co-sponsor(s): Phyto-Riker Hopkins Lawrence and Baily, JMA Construction, Traco Investigations
Purpose - trade mission
Total Cost - $2,800.00

ORTIZ, SOLOMON P - Democratic Party
October 23, 2003 - October 26, 2003 (4 days)
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Co-sponsor(s): Sony Music, Altria, CNN - Late Edition, Pfizer, Inc., Coca Cola Enterprises Inc, AstraZeneca, Aventis, Eli Lilly Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, Puerto Rico Telephone
Purpose - "Tri-Caucus Retreat" to improve relationships between member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus; the Cong. Black Caucus and the Cong/ Asian Pacific American Caucus
Total Cost - $5,736.66

HOYER, STENY HAMILTON - Democratic Party
March 3, 2000 - March 5, 2000 (3 days)
Birmingham, AL - Montgomery, AL - Selma, AL
Co-sponsor(s): Faith and Politics Institute, Alabama Power Company, Delta Air Lines Inc, Coca Cola Enterprises Inc, Daimler Chrysler, General Motors, Caterpillar Inc, Pew Charitable Trust, National Chamber Foundation, Microsoft
Purpose - Alabama Pilgrimage to celebrate 35th Anniversary of '65 Voting Rights Act March
Total Cost - $989.00

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in a Chinese immersion class in Utah. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.