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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

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MCCONNELL, MITCH, Republican Party
Kentucky

Total number of trips - 9
Total cost of trips - $19,161.84

Average cost per trip - $2,129.09
Total number of days spent traveling - 23 days
Rank of representative - 315 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
Dates - March 5, 2000 - March 6, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Palm Beach, FL

Purpose - to speak at AIPAC's annual Palm Beach Washington Club meeting
Notes -

Travel Cost - $527.00
Lodging Cost - $223.88
Meal Cost - $150.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $900.88

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Peabody Group, St. Louis MO
Dates - February 12, 2001 - February 12, 2001 (1 days)
Location(s) - Madisonville, KY

Purpose - To announce opening of new Peabody plan in Muhlenberg County, KY
Notes - Madisonville, KY - Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $354.99
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $354.99

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
Dates - August 28, 2001 - August 29, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - Cleveland, OH

Purpose - Remarks at Cleveland Committee for AIPAC reception and dinner honoring AIPAC president, Tim Wuliger
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,200.50
Lodging Cost - $190.24
Meal Cost - $16.57
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,407.31

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Armenian Assembly of America
Dates - December 8, 2001 - December 9, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - Los Angeles, CA

Purpose - keynote dinner event celebrating the 10th Anniversary of Armenian Independence, Beverly Hilton Hotel, Beverly Hills, CA
Notes - lodging: senator and wife, Elaine Chao, stayed with a friend. Washington, DC -- Los Angeles, CA -- Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $2,214.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,214.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Center for the Study of Popular Culture
Dates - November 15, 2002 - November 16, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Palm Beach, FL

Purpose - Remarks at annual "Restoration Weekend" luncheon on Saturday, November 16 at the Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach, CA
Notes - Meal and lodging expenses include those of my wife, Elaine Chao, whose attendance was "appropriate to assist in the representation of the Senate (rule 35.2 (d) (f)). Senator's transpiration costs only - that of his wife was paid by NRSC

Travel Cost - $1,134.00
Lodging Cost - $240.00
Meal Cost - $335.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,709.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - American Farm Bureau Federation
Dates - January 6, 2002 - January 7, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Reno, NV

Purpose - annual convention, to be presented with AFBF Distinguished Service Award on 1/6, and to attend Kentucky Farm Bureau breakfast 1/7
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,924.50
Lodging Cost - $235.20
Meal Cost - $30.81
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,190.51

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Congressional Institute
Dates - December 1, 2003 - December 2, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Middleburg, VA

Purpose - Attendance at annual Senate Leadership Retreat
Notes - Congressional Institute is at 401 Wythe St., Alexandria, VA 22314

Travel Cost - $123.00
Lodging Cost - $317.00
Meal Cost - $299.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $739.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
Dates - June 18, 2004 - June 20, 2004 (3 days)
Location(s) - Beaver Creek, CO

Purpose - Speaking engagement and panel participation - AEI World Forum
Notes -

Travel Cost - $2,570.00
Lodging Cost - $370.00
Meal Cost - $270.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,210.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - August 20, 2005 - August 26, 2005 (7 days)
Location(s) - Dublin, Ireland

Purpose - Aspen Institute conference related to US/EU/Russia relations
Notes -

Travel Cost - $3,474.15
Lodging Cost - $1,562.00
Meal Cost - $1,400.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $6,436.15

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.